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How to increase audience engagement on live video

Increasing Audience Engagement with Live Video

Let’s say you organized a live event and you managed to get some sponsors and you invited a panel of speakers plus a guest host and then the day of the event turned out to have a torrential rain storm and only 12 people showed up?

Not so great, right?

But what if you live streamed your event? – and encouraged audience engagement? Could you reach a much larger audience and turn your first-time turnout into a big success…?

Here’s an example of a first-time event that had an attendance of fewer than 20 people (including the presenters!) and yet managed to reach an online audience of hundreds viewers who watched the live stream. This case study shows how you can dramatically increase audience engagement.

Just this week, I was at an event that was the first time this event had ever happened. And it was in the morning. It started at 8:00AM and it was on a really rainy day.

You can imagine the turnout we had.

For this event the organizer had recruited three panelists and a host plus another guest speaker and two sponsors who also got up and spoke to the audience – a total of eight people including the organizer himself. The total number of people was less than twenty – so the audience size was pretty modest for this first-time event.

We could have all been quite disappointed at this turnout. However, I was there with my phone and I made the whole thing go live onto Facebook which gave us the chance to reach a much bigger group of people.

I’d like to share with you the results we got from this experiment. There were two things that worked really well for this kind of audience building.

The first thing that happened was that I got up in front of the group and I asked them to pull out their phone and to go to the Awesome Videomakers page on Facebook where they could see the live stream. I enrolled them in the vision of helping us grow the event simply by hitting the share button.

We got a total of 16 shares. Which means practically everyone there actually did what I asked them to. It’s an amazing response from the number of people who were there.

What did that do for us? The live stream had a total reach of over 3,000 people and over 800 views! From an audience of 20 to and audience of 800!

The second thing that we did that seemed to work well was that we asked people who were wathing the video to respond to us during the presentation.

In this case the event was all about leadership for millennials. The organizer of the event asked the audience, “Which generation are you? Are you a millennial? A baby boomer? Generation x? Or generation y? In the comments write in ‘millennial’ or write in ‘baby boomer.'”

And that was a very good prompt. And this is the kind of thing that you want to be doing in your events to get people to respond to you in the comments – even when they’re watching during the replay.

Don’t ask tough questions where they have to write long answers. Give them a multiple choice or give them the word to say to respond. And what that does for you is that it takes an anonymous group of viewers who will now identify themselves. They raise their hand and say, “Here’s my answer.” Facebook displays their name and profile picture so you can reply to them and start having a real conversation.

And then, of course, make sure you invite them to your next event.

Want to learn more about how to increase audience engagement and the nuances of audience building? Then join my FREE Videomaking Mastermind group on Facebook where there’s a daily discussion and lots of video examples being shared.

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How to be ignored & unpopular: the Joshua Bell Subway Video

Here‘s a story about great talent going unnoticed.

Joshua Bell playing incognito in the metro station was organized by the Washington Post as part of a social experiment about perception, taste, and priorities of people.

The questions they were asking:

In a commonplace environment at an inappropriate hour do we perceive beauty? Click To Tweet

Do we stop to appreciate it? Do we recognize talent in an unexpected context?

Why is great talent not enough?

“A man sat at a metro station in Washington DC and started to play the violin; it was a cold January morning. He played six Bach pieces for about 45 minutes. During that time, since it was rush hour, it was calculated that 1,100 people went through the station, most of them on their way to work.

Three minutes went by, and a middle aged man noticed there was a musician playing. He slowed his pace, and stopped for a few seconds, and then hurried up to meet his schedule.

A minute later, the violinist received his first dollar tip: a woman threw the money in the till and without stopping, and continued to walk.

A few minutes later, someone leaned against the wall to listen to him, but the man looked at his watch and started to walk again. Clearly he was late for work.

The one who paid the most attention was a 3 year old boy. His mother tagged him along, hurried, but the kid stopped to look at the violinist. Finally, the mother pushed hard, and the child continued to walk, turning his head all the time. This action was repeated by several other children. All the parents, without exception, forced them to move on.

In the 45 minutes the musician played, only 6 people stopped and stayed for a while. About 20 gave him money, but continued to walk their normal pace. He collected $32. When he finished playing and silence took over, no one noticed it. No one applauded, nor was there any recognition.

No one knew this, but the violinist was Joshua Bell, one of the most talented musicians in the world. He had just played one of the most intricate pieces ever written, on a violin worth $3.5 million dollars.”

Two days before his playing in the subway, Joshua Bell sold out at a theater here in Boston where the seats averaged $100.

The real story behind the Joshua Bell subway video

 

joshua bell subwayWhat bothers me about this story is not that Joshua Bell went unnoticed – it’s the suggestion that since he was ignored there must be something wrong with us and that if we can’t take a few minutes out of our day to notice great talent then we’re kind of doomed to a boring, mundane, existence.

No. I can’t accept this.

What bothers me is that this story is like the one about the king who disguises himself as a beggar and goes out among the common folk – and then ends up being surprised that no one recognizes or accepts him as king once he reveals himself.

There are situations every day of the year where a great many talented people are practicing their craft – and yet they are getting a response equivalent to people ignoring Joshua Bell in the subway.

The simple truth: your talent is not enough

Many of us believe that if we put in the work and we hone our skills and we become the best at what we do – that our talent will shine through and people will recognize and reward us with their patronage.

Actually, you’re story will likely end up like the Joshua Bell subway video. You’ll be ignored.

I know that Joshua’s performance was meant as an experiment and that he purposefully did nothing to showcase himself – except to play his violin. But let’s imagine what he might have done to attract some attention.

Location, Location, Location

Joshua’s first mistake was that he was playing near the entrance to the subway. Everyone knows that early morning commuters are notoriously in a hurry and that when they enter a subway station they will hurry on down to the train platform almost no matter what. On the other hand, the train platform itself has a captive audience – because no matter how much of a hurry you’re in – you’re not going anywhere until the next train comes.

Joshua could have placed himself on a platform and, in between train arrivals, he could have been playing his heart out to an audience that he knew would be forced to wait and listen.

This is important. No matter what it is that you do – you can find an audience that will love your work. Where do they hang out? Where could you find the equivalent of a captive audience? Go there.

Anticipation

joshua bell subway videoThere was a time when all across the United States there were little signs put up along the highway with clever little rhymes. This was an ad campaign by Burma Shave. The series was always in the same structure: four signs each with one line of a rhyme – always humorous with a punch line.

For example:

Don’t put your elbow
Out too far
It may go home
in another car

(there was always a fifth sign that said ‘Burma Shave’ – the ad part)

I remember traveling across the country in my family’s station wagon (at five years old) looking eagerly for the next signs and reading each one aloud. The anticipation was half the fun. I also remember that people made up their own rhymes – as a kind of parody – always ending with ‘burma shave’ which turned out to be an amazingly creative viral strategy for the company.
(full disclosure – the above example may, in fact, be one of the parody rhymes – it’s the only one I can remember off the top of my head)

Not Another Roadside Attraction

joshua bell subway videoTwo decades ago the poet William Stafford used this exact same technique to showcase his poetry. Stafford, a very talented and celebrated poet from Washington state, was grappling with the challenge of how exactly do you bring poetry to the mainstream? How can you get mom and dad and all the kids reading poetry together?

Well, he published a series of poems as roadside attractions along a lonely stretch of highway in the Methow Valley in Eastern Washington. His poems were each placed on weatherproof signs at a series of road turnouts along the route – usually where there was also an incredible view of the natural scenery of the North Cascade Mountains.

A Valley Like This

Sometimes you look at an empty valley like this
and suddenly the air is filled with snow.
That is the way the whole world happened –
there was nothing, and then…

But maybe sometime you will look out and even
the mountains are gone. the world become nothing
again. What can a person do to help
bring back the world?

We have to watch it and then look at each other.
Together we hold it close and carefully
save it, like a bubble that can disappear
if we don’t watch out.

Please think about this as you go on. Breathe on the world.
Hold out your hands to it. When mornings and evenings
roll along, watch how they open and close, how they
invite you to the long party that your life is.

By going to where his target group would be and speaking directly to them, William Stafford captured his audience.

As a result his poetry has been read, and shared, by a larger and far more diverse population.(note these poems were all posted in the pre-internet era.)

You can accomplish the same level of engagement that Stafford did by speaking simply and directly to your audience and addressing their desires.

Imagine if, back in the subway, Joshua Bell had collaborated with a poet who wrote out four lines of poetry about the beauty of music played on a violin – and these lines were then placed on four signs leading to Joshua’s location on a train platform (where everyone would have to listen while waiting for the next train)?

How many would Joshua have engaged then?

Want to harness your audience’s anticipation – and convert your customers into raving fans? Then join my FREE Videomaking Mastermind Group on Facebook

https://www.facebook.com/groups/videomakingmastermind/

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What a Boston Attitude Taught me About Ideal Clients

Here’s how I learned the number one thing you can do to attract ideal clients

I live in Boston and when I first moved here from the west coast, I didn’t understand a lot about the local culture. One of the first things that I did when I got here was to go down to Cape Cod and check out the beaches. A friend and I drove down to a town called Woods Hole. When we got there we were driving around looking for the local beach and we couldn’t find it.

Then I saw this guy walking along the side of the road and I said, “He looks like he’s local, let’s ask him.” We pulled over and I rolled down the window and I said, “Hey, do you live around here?”

He took one look at me and said, “WHAT’S-IT MATTAH?”

And I thought, “Oh, this is the local greeting…”

It turned out that he warmed up and he did tell us where the beach was, but my point is that his response is exactly the same as what you’re going to get every time you reach out to your prospective clients or to your ideal target audience. They are always going to come back to you and say, “What’s it matter? Why does it matter to me?

If, in your presentation, you’re not telling them why it matters, they’re not going to pay attention. If all you’re talking about is yourself and you’re not talking about them and their problems, they just don’t care.

I’ve been helping entrepreneurs tell their “Why does it matter” story for the last 10 years and I’ve come to believe two things. The first one is that everyone has a story that’s worth listening to. And the second thing is that because you have a story worth listening to, then you have a responsibility to get it out in the world.

And yet what I see, over and over, is that a lot of entrepreneurs have a great gift, they’ve got this great passion, but when it comes time to tell their story, they crash and burn. And this can be even more pronounced when it comes to telling your story on video.

When people consider doing video and they think it’s too much trouble, it’s too daunting, it’s going to take too much time, it’s going to cost too much money.

I’d like to bust those myths wide open.

If you want to know what it REALLY takes to attract your ideal clients with video and grow your profitable coaching business, then join my FREE Videomaking Mastermind Facebook group here: 

https://www.facebook.com/groups/videomakingmastermind/

 

How to achieve inconceivable success with live video

Sometimes we can feel like our social media stuff is getting way out of hand. Trying to pay attention to Facebook and Twitter and Youtube and LinkedIn and Instagram and your blog – posting to ALL those platforms – is overwhelming. (And then I come along and suggest you start doing live video?!)

It can feel like you’re traveling in six different directions – and it’s a bit of a gerbil wheel because it’s often hard to tell what kind of results you’re getting.

So, recently I decided to take a different approach.

What if I focussed all of my online activities to support things I’m doing offline – in the real world? After all, the main goal of all this online marketing is to actually meet people and start working with them, yes?

I started experimenting with Facebook Live and just last week I achieved *inconceivable live video success…!

I’m now hosting two live events each month and each event has guest speakers. So, my new content marketing strategy has evolved to do weekly interview with a guest of an upcoming event on Facebook Live – where they can share actionable content. We talk about the guest and invite people to come to the next event.

The live video can be shared with the guest’s audience on Facebook in addition to my own – so I’m able to reach new people with every broadcast.

I wanted to share early results from this experiment because it’s doing even better than I expected.

In this recent interview I was talking with Digital Marketer Taylor Kloss via Skype and doing a live broadcast of our conversation. Here’s what happened: this video reached 390 people and the video had 229 views.

I had a specific call to action which was to invite people to my Big Idea Lab event which was the first thing I say at the start – so I have a pretty clear idea that 229 people actually saw, heard or watched my invitation!

Comparing this to an earlier post I did to announce the same event. A regular post with an image and a link to register had a reach of only 6 people and there’s no way to tell if any of those people even noticed the invitation.

Clearly Facebook likes live video and will reward you when you make one by showing it to more people.

But it gets better.

I can take the same video and upload it to Youtube and post it on LinedIn and share a screenshot on Instagram (and tag Taylor) and post a link to it on Twitter (and tag Taylor). And, like I’m doing right now, turn it into a blog post and then send it out via email.

This is no longer doing six different things all going in six different directions. One piece of content that took 10 minutes to produce. And it’s in support of growing my community in the real world!

Did it work? As of this writing the next Big Idea Lab has over 50 people registered. Which, as far as I’m concerned is a huge success!

If you’ve gone way down the social media rabbit hole and are feeling a little strung out from your content marketing, I invite you to join my FREE Videomaking Mastermind Group on Facebook where you can learn more about how to build engagement and trust with you ideal clients – before they even meet you – by doing Facebook Live Video.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/videomakingmastermind/

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How to create change and transformation with video

What’s the biggest thing standing in the way of anyone wanting to create change in their life?

Your business solves a BIG problem – you help your clients make positive changes in their life – and that has huge value, right? So, when you start talking with prospective clients, you may be thinking that if you could just show them the great advantages of working with you, they’d be sure to do it. But describing your process or features, and even your benefits, may not do the trick – no matter how good a job you do of describing your work.

You’re fishing with awesome bait. Why won’t they bite?

The reason is… they don’t think it’s possible.

And this isn’t because they don’t believe you. It’s because they don’t believe in themselves. They don’t think they can do it. They’ve already tried a bunch of things to solve their problem – and it hasn’t worked. So they’ve giving up. They’ve settled for living with whatever version of chronic pain they’re dealing with…

What can you do to help them when they’ve become non-believers? …when they’ve lost their faith?

The answer is simple: tell them a good story.

Tell them a story about someone who is facing the same sort of challenges. Who tried many of the things they tried. Who maybe even gave up on themselves – but who found a solution (by doing your thing).

Why would a story work?

When you tell a story – and this works particularly well with video – the people watching and listening will relate to the character (the hero) of the story. And when the hero experiences pain or despair or triumph – your audience will have the same experience. 

This is the way our brains are wired. When you watch a film – and the main character is having an emotional experience – you experience the same emotions.

This ability is an evolutionary advantage that has been handed down to us since the time of humans sharing stories around a fire. When someone showed up with a story about how they met a tiger and then escaped without getting eating – we’d all pay very close attention – so we could learn about how not to get eaten by the tiger.

When you are able to give your audience the experience of the transformation you offer – a part of the solution to the problem your business serves – you help them believe that a solution is possible. And when they have the experience of possibility with you – you become very attractive. This is why a good story telling video works so well.

Create Change Case Study – Let Me Dance!

Watch the video (above) and you’ll see a group of silver haired women moving gracefully in an adult ballet class.

One by one, they each describe their experience of the class – and we witness their transformation – from feeling old and ordinary to feeling beautiful and able. Listening to the music, watching their movements, hearing their stories about their own transformation – helps us feel the same things they are feeling – gives us the same experience – and helps us believe that we, too, could move gracefully and be beautiful…

How did this video work its magic?

The video was made for an adult ballet class in a small town in the UK. The teacher wanted to attract more students so she engaged a local videographer. The ballet students were shot while they were dancing and also in one-on-one testimonial interviews.

We never hear from the teacher – only her students – who talk about their experience. There’s no script. The whole thing was shot with one camera and available light.

It proves how one simple video – one good story – can create change in our mindset. The dancing women transform – becoming beautiful and graceful before our eyes – making us believers. I couldn’t help thinking, “I hope I’m moving like that when I’m their age,” or better, “I could be moving like that right now!”

And it worked its magic on a multitude. The video has been seen over 1.7 million times on Facebook.

Two things to take away from this video:

1. Testimonial stories can be more powerful and persuasive than talking about what you do yourself.

2. If you pick a beautiful and inspiring story – people will share it (which is how this video has been seen so many times).

If you’d like to learn more about the kind of stories you could be telling to help your prospective clients believe that their transformation is possible, then join my FREE Videomaking Mastermind group on Facebook

It’s a supportive group to share ideas and inspiration with each other.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/videomakingmastermind/

Rinse and repeat – Video making by volume

I’d like to let you off the hook.

If you’re like me, you are a bit of a perfectionist. Any time you’ve thought of bringing your work into the world you’ve wanted to make sure that it’s your best. And you take a lot of time polishing and tweaking before you feel ready to show it to anyone.

It doesn’t have to be this way. In fact, your work will get a whole lot better if you focus less on perfecting and more on creating and sharing as often as possible.

How do you ensure you’re doing your best work? Get out in front of people and get their feedback

Case in point comes from a cool little book called Art and Fear. A pottery teacher split his class in half and asked the first half to focus on making one incredibly wonderful piece of pottery. Then he told the other half to make a lot of pots saying they’d be evaluated on their quantity (rather than quality).

So, who came up with the best work?

Invariably, all the best pots came from the group making as many pots as possible.

You can apply this lesson to whatever endeavor you’re engaged with: if you want to make something really great, you need to start making. Striving for perfection will just get in your way.

I know. You just don’t feel ready. You have a Goldilocks mindset. You want everything to be just right.

Don’t let your inner perfectionist hold you back.

Treat your work as an ongoing experiment and embrace the mess you create. Expect the unexpected. Treat everything you do as a learning process.

Do this often. Rinse and repeat.

Case study: Pulse reader

In 2010, right at the time the first ipad came out, two students, Ankit Gupta and Akshay Kothari, were in a one-month course called “Launchpad” in which the students have to start a real company. In order to get into the class you have to pitch a business idea so our two heros raised the question, “why is the experience of mobile news browsing so bad?” And they pitched the idea of a creating a news reader app for the ipad.

rinse and repeatTheir first assignment was to build a functional prototype in 4 days.

To get the job done quickly, they chose to sit in a cafe (a room full of prospective users for their reader) where they had a quick, rough version of their app open on an ipad. Since the ipad was brand new, this was super attractive to everyone who passed by. People who had never seen one would ask about the ipad and they’d let them play with the basic version of their new app. They got tons of immediate feedback from cafe patrons and, as a result, went through hundreds of small revisions each day.

Their published app, called “Pulse Reader” turned out impressive enough to be shown off by Steve Jobs himself and, later on, was sold to LinkedIn for $90 million!! (this story came from the book, Creative Confidence)

How can you get into the rinse and repeat mindset?

Move from planning to action. Share quick, rough versions of a product or service your working on to get fast feed-back. Put a time constraint on yourself. Imagine you have a boss who’s telling you, “I want to see something by the end of the day.” See how quickly you can turn your ideas into action.

Rinse and repeat is a core principle of my program, Video Power Strategy™. It’s about engaging your audience in a way that they ensure you’re doing your best work.

As an experiential educator I’ve seen first-hand how well learning by doing works. If you want to do your best work (and if you want your business to thrive) then you need to jump in with rapid innovation cycles of creating a piece of work, showing it off and learning from the feedback you get. Learn by doing. Rinse and repeat.

Want instant feedback for the next video project you’re working on?
Join our group on Facebook and share often >

3 ways to get your target audience thrilled about your big idea

There are few things more frustrating than pouring your heart into your big idea only to see it struggle to take off.

Whether you’re organizing a project, promoting an event or selling a product or service, there’s nothing worse than spending weeks or months of effort to make something happen – and then nobody shows up, or your phone isn’t ringing, or you’re making videos that nobody’s watching.

When this happens it’s problem of enrollment – you’ve failed to fully enroll your target audience.

In their fantastic book, “The Art of Possibility,” co-authors Benjamin an Rosamund Zander spend an entire chapter talking about what it takes to get someone fully enrolled. “Enrolling is not about forcing, cajoling, tricking, bargaining, pressuring, or guilt tripping someone into doing something your way. Enrollment is the art and practice of generating a spark of possibility for others to share. Have no doubt that others eager to catch the spark”.

Can you imagine a world where others are eager to catch your spark?

The Zanders suggest that you approach enrollment as lighting a spark of possibility in others and then be ready to catch their spark in return. Enrollment will take courage in the face of possible rejection(s). Maintaining your passion and a mindset of possibility is essential.

Ready to fully enroll your target audience? Here we go.

1. Join the conversation

In my earlier post on how to introduce yourself on video so that it matters I was dissing social media by saying it’s turned us all into one-way broadcasters – and you only have to spend 10 seconds looking at anyone’s Twitter feed to see the sad truth in this.

But, there’s also a conversation going on about your thing.

To find the conversation, search hashtags on Twitter and Instagram (like #smallbusiness or #communitygarden or #climatechange) or join a Facebook group or go to a local Meetup – you’ll find out what your people are talking about.

You’ll want to look for what they’re saying about the problem that you want to help them solve.

2. Look for questions, frustrations and desires

These are the things that are most relevant to the people who you are wanting to enroll. Personally, the place where I’ve found the most engaged conversations have been in a few of the Facebook groups that I belong to. (and, of course, my own Facebook group)

What you’ll discover are points of engagement. You’ll see questions that generate long threads of discussion and learn which kind of frustrations or desires resonate most.

It doesn’t matter if you think they’re asking the right questions – these are the questions they’re asking – so that’s where you want to start engaging.

3. Respond with something different

You’re going to discover that people have already tried a lot of things to answer their questions, fix their frustrations, and make their dreams come true. If it’s available they’re checking it out. You need to take the time to study what else is out there too, so you can respond with something unique – something they haven’t tried yet.

How does this work in practice?

Here’s an example based on how I like to engage. Let’s say my preferred method of connection is to go to a networking event or a conference. What I find at almost every business related event is plenty of people (like me) who offer marketing services of one kind or another. In fact it sometimes feels like the room is full of marketers.

And everyone there is introducing themselves with the same question, “What do you do?”

And everyone answers the same way – by talking about themselves.

At an event like try entering the conversation, by saying something different. What if you refused to give an answer by talking about yourself. What if instead you answered by responding to the questions, frustrations and desires that are on the minds of practically everyone in the room?

So, for example, after someone asks me what I do, I might answer with, “I like to help people have more meaningful interactions at networking events (like this one) so they meet the kinds of people they’re looking for, attract the right kind of clientele and so they don’t end up feeling like they’ve totally wasted their time.”

See what I did there?

Now I’m talking about the questions and desires and potential frustrations of practically everyone in the room. All of a sudden I’m positioning myself as someone who might have something different to talk about – and be offering the possibility of a unique value proposition.

Whoever I’m talking to is probably wondering, “What you just mentioned is something that I want to know more about – how do you do that?” So, we can keep talking and I can keep asking questions and learn more about their frustrations and desires.

This is exactly what you want to do.

Don’t enter the conversation by talking about your big idea – start by talking about the thing that is their top of mind frustration or desire. If you’re unsure of what that is, then ask a question.

You can craft content like this in your videos and share it on social media, and when you do people will start thinking you’re reading their minds.

if you’d like more interaction than this once-per-week blog post, join my Facebook Group and leave your comments there >

How to create good conversation questions for your business

Think for just a minute about the last time you spent in good conversation with one of your closest friends. Imagine what that conversation was like. What was the pacing like? your listening? their response? the times that you talked from your heart? It’s likely that your conversation was a two-way exchange.
Compare that with the last time you sent an email message to your audience. Or the last time you wrote a blog post. Was there the same kind of listening going on?

Can you imagine that your last email blast was, in fact, any kind of conversation at all?

OK, so now you’re thinking, “Well, Brad, how do I have a conversation when I’m sending a mass email or writing a blog post? I’m writing by myself and there’s nobody talking back to me.

conversation questions1. Ask a question

I have one idea for you which is: ask a question that’s very intriguing – and encourages a response.

2. Tell a story

Or tell a story that’s like some kind of mystery

3. Make a promise

Make a promise that at the beginning offers to answer the question and if people will only pay attention to what you’re saying, they’ll find out what the answer is.

4. Leave room – for your customer to be heard

Even better, when you’re on social media, make your customers part of the conversation. Ask a question – and people will answer – in the comments below. Listen to and engage with customers and your business will benefit in ways that you’ve never imagined.

My conversation questions for you?

What questions are you asking your audience? Or what questions are you going to ask your audience – today?

Join my FREE Videomaking Mastermind group on Facebook and leave a comment. I’ll answer every time. I promise to be a good listener.

Two Unbelievable Camera Shyness Success Stories

When you’re faced with a feeling of camera shyness, what’s it costing you in your life when you aren’t showing up?

Where does your shyness show up in other aspects of your work?

camera shynessI have a client who’s work is helping Moms feel less overwhelmed. She’s creating a daily planner especially designed for Moms called ‘The Artful Planner.’  But, when we first talked about making a video that would promote her work she said, “There’s no way I’m going to be in the video.”

Which, not all that surprisingly, is how a lot of people react when I first bring up video making.

Time to strap on the GoPro

In this case we came up with a creative solution that showcased my client’s planner using a you-are-there point of view with the help of a GoPro camera.

The cool thing about GoPro is that you get to be in the driver’s seat of whoever is wearing the camera on their head. (Think base jumpers, surfers and other extreme sport fanatics.) In this case we simply showed a-day-in-the-life of how any Mom might use an Artful Planner.

Using a GoPro is a great tool for any small business to show off their process. Click To Tweet

This was so much fun to make! I had my client wear the camera on her head and I controlled shooting via an ipad monitor. A 9-inch monitor!! I was also using a second camera – so I found that I could do a two-camera shoot simultaneously.

When you’re thinking to show your work, and promote your work to others, you really want to think process, not product. Share a unique glimpse of what you’re working on. By sharing your day-to-day process – the things you really care about – you can form a unique bond with your audience.

Show your work, share your creativity and get discovered

camera shynessI just put down Austin Kleon’s most recent book – which is great for quick inspiration on sharing your creativity with others (you can read the whole thing in about 10 minutes – there’s lots of pictures). Austin proposes that you show your work in the form of a daily dispatch. And that if we do, then over time the small contributions will begin to add up to something profound.

The process is nothing terribly involved: Austin recommends spending 15 or 30 minutes at the end of each day selecting and sharing something on your social networks.

That’s it.

“What I mean by that is one little bit of media that you push out every day, some little piece of your process that you share with people,” he says. Set yourself a daily goal to show your work: one photo (or a 15-second video) on Instagram, tweeting the favorite sentence you read that day, doing a blog post about something you love.

Imagine strapping a GoPro to your head and sharing moments from your work day. In 15-second Instagram snippets.

Just remember to give value when you share.

“The act of sharing is one of generosity — you’re putting something out there because you think it might be helpful or entertaining to someone on the other side of the screen.”

You can start sharing your work – and getting great feedback – by joining my Videomaking Mastermind Facebook Group and sharing your live videos there.