Inspirational Metaphors
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How to Engage Your Video Audience with Inspirational Metaphors

Here’s a case study showing how a simple video was made great by using inspirational metaphors about how the Grand Canyon was formed. Watch how one of the members in my Video making Mastermind group on Facebook shot this video of herself with the Grand Canyon in the background.

Meet personal trainer, Anne Caulkins. Her business is called Wicked Lean and if you’re at all interested in going out there and getting yourself wicked lean, then you should sign up for Anne’s online personal training program – that will give you the body you want.

I made a few suggestions about Anne’s first video. The first one was, “Hey Anne, turn your phone sideways, so we can see more of the canyon!”

The second thing that I suggested was to engage her viewers more. Here she was talking about the Grand Canyon, standing in front of the Grand Canyon, and it would be easy to say, “How many of you have been to the Grand Canyon? If you’ve ever been here before, say, ‘Yes!'”

And in the comments down below people could have said, “Yes, yes yes” and they could’ve mentioned when they were there or what happened to them when they were there. That’s a really good, easy thing to do as a prompt to get people to respond to you.

Next I noted that she’d brought up the inspirational metaphors of, “Here you have this huge canyon, but it took just little drops of water to create it. And those little drops of water were very powerful.” There again she could engage her viewers with questions like, “What are the little drops of water that you’re doing? What’s the little drop of water you’re doing today that’s going to be carving out your Grand Canyon?” Or even better, “What’s the Grand Canyon that you’re carving out?

Two days later Anne made a second video and I just had to share it to show you how easy it is to make just a couple of little shifts that will make all the difference in your video.

I think the second video looks fantastic. This way of using inspirational metaphors in your video is a very powerful thing in terms of getting them to respond to while they’re watching your video – so that they’ll leave a comment and then you can start having a longer conversation with them by replying.

My drop of water is that I make videos. Every week I’m making a new video like this and that little drop of water is carving out a great big canyon of empowering people to show up, and to be themselves, and to share their gifts.

By sharing my own gifts on a regular basis, I’m helping you, and hopefully inspiring you to get out there in the world and gather your people around you and share your gifts with them.

I’d love it if you would comment and tell me, “What’s the drop of water that you’re doing on a regular basis to share your gifts?” And, even better, “What is your Grand Canyon?”

My big invitation to you is to join my FREE Videomaking Mastermind Group on Facebook

http://facebook.com/groups/videomakingmastermind

Join us, share your videos there, and you’ll see how just little tiny shifts your videos will be getting better and better, and you will start showing up more and more.

My special thanks to Anne Caulkins – Wicked Lean
https://www.facebook.com/WickedLean/

document your journey
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How to Document Your Journey with Live Video

When it comes to making videos, a lot of people are held back because they think they have to create a lot of new content all the time. You might spend all their time thinking about what to create and how to create it and you end up not producing many videos.

Don’t do this.

Instead, the way to start is to document your journey. Show us your process. Take us behind the scenes of what you do for work and in your daily life.

This is perfect for live video and easy to do. Whenever you find yourself in the middle of something, or stuck on a problem, or in a moment of inspiration – go live and document your journey.

If you want to be respected and known for what you do – then start showing up – by showing what you do! Don’t get stalled by thinking it has to be perfect, or scripted, or a finished product.

Live video is a perfect vehicle because it can’t be perfect. It let’s you off the hook and gives you permission to show up as who you are. People who want to create content make a big mistake: they care about the camera, and the lighting, and how they look…

Yes, you can do simple things just using your smartphone to make your video look professional and beautiful (and I can show you how) but don’t let that keep you from going live – and showing up.

Live video helps you be transparent. I mean, really, you don’t need to know all the answers. So, it can be much more effective to show your process of going through your work – facing your challenges – and growing your business – than coming up with the advice that you think you need to give people.

Think about how to document more than thinking about creating. The key is to talk to people around you and get their stories and reactions. The other key is to start!

I’d love to have you make a short video like the one above – showing part of your morning commute. Show us who you are and post it in my FREE Videomaking Mastermind Facebook Group

http://facebook.com/groups/videomakingmastermind

smartphone videos
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How to make Smartphone Videos that make you look smart

My friend Terri Ann Heiman has been thinking about making videos for awhile. But something’s been holding her back. She’s been afraid of how she looks on video – something we can all share, right? We’ve all seen videos others have made that didn’t turn out so well. And we’re afraid because we don’t want to be that person. I mean, what if you made a video that’s just not how you want to be seen? Especially in front of all your friends on Facebook? It’s enough to keep anyone from hitting the record button.

Here’s a beautiful story of how Terri overcame her video anxiety and made a couple of simple smartphone videos (to promote her podcast). It’s a perfect case study because she made some of the most common mistakes that almost everyone makes when they start making videos with their phone. And with three simple tweaks – she created something really nice – and now feels inspired to do lots more.

Terri posted her first smartphone video on Facebook – and then called me out because I’d been pushing her to make smartphone videos.

“Ok Brad… I did this with you in mind. It was easier to “just do it” without the worry of what I looked like. But still fighting with that issue! I will overcome… right!”


I wrote back, “Hey Terri – You look great & sound fabulous!! And most importantly enthusiastic! – I think I caught your spirit 😉 Way to jump out there… Let me know you’d like some handy hints on how to look and sound even more fabulous.”

She replied, “Yes I would for sure!”

OK, Step #1: watch the video below on ‘Vertical Video Syndrome’ and then just say, ‘NO’ to vertical video.

Step #2: Raise you phone up so that it’s at the same level as your eyes. You’ll look even more beautiful if you do this. You can use a large box or a stack of books or what I use is one of these little iphone tripods with bendy legs that grab onto just about anything and mount almost anywhere.

 

smartphone video(Terri commented: “Hello ..I have one of those tripods sitting next to me! Thanks!”)

Step 3: Position yourself so that your room light hits the front of your face – instead of the top of your head. Overhead lights = very harsh + deep lines.”

(Terri commented: “Hmm… that’s going to take some staging! Going to play with that one!”)

So I said, “You might not have to move. Just turn off the overhead light. Open up any windows and/or get a floor lamp or desk lamp with a diffuse shade and aim it at your smiling face.”

Then, just after recording her podcast, Terri posted this second video, “Wow.. Brad Powell what a difference! Thanks!”

Here are some of the Facebook comments after this second video:

smartphone videos

One more suggestion: Terri’s phone is mounted in a way that’s causing some camera shake. So, mount your phone on something that isn’t connected to your movement.

Here’s a third video Terri made that keep’s the camera nice and steady.

BTW – I love the in-the-studio-with-Terri look…

Terri commented, “I’m noticing the likes from the video creating more attention for the podcast. Excited (did I say that?!) for my next video posting now that I know these tips!”

Terri’s first video received 150 views and the second had 280 views and the third broke 300. This is a minor hit – and a simple way for Terri to grab attention for her podcast.

And how does Terri feel about this process? She writes:

“Brad and I talked about using video for visibility and he challenged me to just start doing it. Use my story. That people would be interested in seeing me. Like getting ready for my radio show with the head phones on, etc. So I took his challenge because I knew I was missing out on opportunities to get my message out. His tips helped my videos to look 100% better! So I kept trying! And he was right about visibility. And about getting more comfortable about doing them. Because I was feeling more confidant on video I was able to reach out for the TV interview too!”

“I can’t believe the visibility I’ve gotten from my last video post (see video above). Over 500 views! Thanks for the encouragement!”

Terri’s done a great job getting started with getting more comfortable and confident in front of the camera – and she’s learning the first basic steps in how to produce simple videos with her smartphone. But this is just the start of how to show the transformation you bring to your clients’ lives and demonstrating the solution your business offers on video.

If you’d like to have a bigger conversation about the kind of story you could be telling with video – to help your prospective clients believe that their transformation is possible, then contact me for a free Video Storytelling Strategy Session >

Set up a time to talk with me below and in our conversation we can develop a strategy to help you…

  • get clear on your story
  • get comfortable in front of a camera
  • get psyched about becoming highly visible.

How to make inspiring action videos (with minimal gear)

The making of a good action video: Wheelchair Skateboarder, Erik Kondo

I’ve never thought of producing action videos. But recently the chance to make something really inspiring changed how I look at action videos. And the project turned out to be one of the most popular videos I’ve ever made.

A short time ago I was riding along the bike trail when I caught site of something impossible. It was my first view of wheelchair skateboarder, Erik Kondo – flying along on his home-made electric skateboard – while balancing in his wheelchair.

I had to check this out.

There’s a lot of things that can be done out there that people just never think of.

So, I chased Erik down and while we were riding along together he began telling me the story of how he came up with the idea to fit his wheelchair onto a skateboard.

My first question I asked was how did it feel?

“I’ve been using a wheelchair for about 30 years and when you use a wheelchair you face forward. When you get on a skateboard you still face forward in the chair – but you go sideways.

It’s a completely different feeling.

Your steering is based on front-to-back balance. It feels really different. That’s what I like about it because I still have my chair with me all the time, but as soon as I jump onto that thing (the skateboard) it completely transforms my mobility experience.”

Next, I asked him how the skateboard was put together.

“I started with a regular longboard, but what it has that’s different is a set of wheel rails. The wheel rails lock the wheels on my chair and prevent them from rolling – while I hold a wheelie. The bottom of the longboard has a motor and a drive train. And the motor is wired to a box that contains all the electrical components – batteries, an electrical speed controller and a receiver. I hold a transmitter in my hand.”

I noted the feat that it takes to hold a wheelie – balance his chair on just two wheels – in order to stay on the skateboard. Erik’s reply was pretty modest.

“Now I’m really trying to work my balance so that I can go over more rough terrain. Right now I’m just limited by my skill. I never really skateboarded before. I don’t have that much experience, but the more I do it the better I get.”

I had to ask him how he was able to figure out such a challenging task: how he came to be riding a skateboard without the use of his legs?

“There’s a lot of things that can be done out there that people just never think of.”

Check out Erik’s Wheelchairboarding page on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Wheelchairboarding

How to shoot an action video (with minimal tools)

action videosThis video was shot entirely hand held. I tend to favor using hand held – especially for action video footage. For the interview section I had a microphone attached to the camera and shot close enough so that you can still hear Erik’s responses. For al the footage on the skateboard park I was holding the camera with two hands and moving in sync with Erik. When we moved to the bike trail, I followed Eric on my bicycle to get the moving shots – one hand on the handle bar and one hand on the camera. A GoPro camera would make these shots a lot easier to capture.

The audio on all the movement footage was not critical because I planned to use Erik’s voice and/or music as the soundtrack.

One thing that really helped this video is the inspiring subject – a guy riding a skateboard on his wheelchair. This video received over five thousand views on Youtube and another thousand views on Facebook simply because wheelchair skateboarding is so unusual.

Want to learn more and share some of the videos you’re making? Join my FREE Videomaking Mastermind Group on Facebook

make an impression

What’s the quickest way to make an impression on video?

Who are your influences?

Want to make an impression? Tell us about the most influencing people in your life. For example…

When I was five years old my mother took me into New York City to see Robert Preston in “The Music Man”. Live on stage.

The character of “The Music Man” had the energy and charisma to galvanize a jaded community (in River City, Iowa) around music. His vision was bringing communities to life with music.

From him I learned how sheer enthusiasm can be so contagious.

I was hooked. I wanted to be the Music Man.

It was probably one of the most shaping influences of my life. We had the soundtrack at home and I used to put the record on and march around the living room singing “Seventysix Trombones in the Big Parade…!” at the top of my lungs.

You have your own story like this.

There’s a fabulous scene, in the video above, about influences in the movie “The Commitments” – a film about a young man who wants to form a soul band in Dublin (of all places). And when the he auditions new band members, he asks only one question: Who are your influences?

make an impressionWhat is so revealing about your influences?

The scene is a set of jump cuts. The front door is opened to each new person who gives just one answer – and yet, instantly, we get an impression of who they are – what they’re personality is like, how they look at the world – (in addition to the certainty that they’re totally wrong for a soul band).

You need to reveal yourself in your video, so ask yourself the same question.

But don’t settle for a one-word answer. Share the details about the influencing people in your life. Tell the whole narrative of how your life has been affected by them.

You have a story of something profound that shaped who you are and revealing yourself means sharing that story.

Tell that story and the world will see you apart from the others.

Are you ready to reveal yourself, share your stories and learn how to make your own videos? Join my FREE Videomaking Mastermind group on Facebook

It’s a free support group where you can share your own videos and get inspiration and positive feedback from others.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/videomakingmastermind/

First Kiss Video

4 Surprising Reasons The First Kiss Video Went Viral

How did the First Kiss Video, a simple, black and white video about strangers kissing, become one of the most viewed business video?

At first blush (pun intended) it would appear that Tatia Pilieva’s First Kiss video of complete strangers kissing – with 156 million YouTube views and counting – was a brilliant viral hit. But what were the essential ingredients that made this video so successful?

1. Showing Emotion

The video (above) invited 20 strangers to meet and kiss for the first time – and captured both the awkward and endearing results. “They shed all these layers in front of our eyes and in front of the cameras and that sweetness and kindness resonated with people.”

2. Making it Real

Each couple was asked to meet on the set – and then they just let the cameras roll. “It felt so real and sincere and it was,” Director Patia Pilieva told the New York Times, saying each couple really did meet for the first time the day they shot.

First Kiss Video3. Turning it into something big

First Kiss succeeds as a clever social experiment in the awkwardness of intimacy – showing a quick study in how easily a kiss creates a visceral bond between two people who barely know each other’s names. For the awesome video maker, Tatia Pilieva, the outcome is amazing: She’s  succeeded in creating something culturally interesting and something that has people interested in discussing its very meaning.

Some of the viewers have told Wren Studio that it “restores their faith in love.” That’s pretty good branding.

4. Telling a great story (and don’t be obvious about trying to sell something)

The fact that it was wasn’t obviously a video advertising campaign may be why the video garnered 1,392,296 Facebook shares, and 68,740 Twitter shares in just 31 days. The First Kiss video was created as a subtle advertisement for clothing company Wren Studio, with all the women in the video wearing Wren clothing. Wren creative director, Melissa Coker wrote in Business Insider that, “Traffic to the Wren website increased 14,000%, and 96% of those visitors are new to the site. Sales in the online store are up over 13,600% compared to the week before the First Kiss Video was released.”

When the video was released on Youtube it reached the front page of Reddit by the first evening. By the next day the video had been viewed almost 2 million times and by the end of the week, it had been viewed over 60 million times. It spawned a bunch of parodies, and was covered in The New York Times, Wall Street Journal, CNN, Bloomberg TV, Adweek, Fast Company, Inc, and many more journals and blogs.

How can you put these lessons into action for your own video storytelling?

You can learn how easy it is to get creative, get more confidence and develop your own low budget video marketing strategy. Join my FREE Videomaking Mastermind Group on Facebook and practice how to be more confident on camera, growing your audience and learn how to turn viewers into clients.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/videomakingmastermind/

video resume

Your Video Resume: How to Star in the Best Job Interview Ever

5 Tips for preparing a polished and professional video resume

Will creating the right video resume make you stand out from the crowd? Getting it right can feel like a tough challenge. Most people get hung up on the thought of making video because they think it’s too hard, too expensive & it will take up too much time. But now, with the help of that smart phone in your pocket, you can produce a professional and attention-getting virtual resume – that just might get you the interview you’re looking for.

If you’re considering going down the video resume route, here’s some advice for you.

1. Make it Relevant

Create a video resume because that’s relevant to the job you want to do. If you’re applying for a role in the online, digital media, social or creative professions, then it’s more likely a decent video resume will have the desired effect, like getting you in the door for an interview.

2. Don’t Read Your Resume

Think of producing your video resume like you would a cover letter. What’s the point of a cover letter? To get someone to read your resume (or call you for an interview). Make your video like the big movie studios and create a teaser, or a cliff-hanger. Give them just enough of your personality to get them interested in learning more (and watching the whole movie).

3. Keep it Short

Best rule of thumb: keep it under 60 seconds. Employers review most paper resumes in less than 10 seconds. So, in your first 10 seconds you’ll want to convince the viewer to watch the rest. Bear that in mind and keep your clips short. The video example above works because it’s broken into five short videos – and while it was ultimately successful in getting a job – some of the segments are a big long.

4. Be Creative

Do something novel or unexpected (like Graham’s costume changes in the opening segment above. This absolutely will help you stand out.

5. Be Yourself

This is the most important aspect of making any video. Interviewers are looking to see if you’re going to be a good ‘fit’ for their company. So be yourself. If someone connects with the person you are, then they’ll call you up. If you’re being yourself and they don’t like what they see, then you probably don’t want to work there.

Case Study – a video resume that went viral with the right crowd

video resumeGraeme Anthony, in the video above, is a graphics designer & public relations executive. His cleverly thought out online content adds an extra wow factor to his already outstanding experience. Anthony had recently moved from Manchester to London and was looking for work at some of the top PR firms and advertising agencies there. To get his foot in the door he created this interactive video resume (featuring a highly creative use of Youtube’s annotated links) as a way to showcase his skills – and get the attention of companies where he wanted to work.

Graeme never intended for his video resume to be widely seen by the general public. He posted the video in ‘unlisted’ mode and then researched and sourced individuals/organizations that he wanted to see his CVIV. But then a couple of PR/Social Media bloggers – Paul Armstrong (Kindred) and Robin Grant (We Are Social) asked if they could post about it.

Not thinking too much of it Graeme gave them his permission and left the house (for a job interview as it happens). Two hours later and he returned to find his Twitter stream and email inbox flooded. Panic instantly set in and straightaway he emailed Robin, ‘What’s happened? Who are all these people? It’s only been two bloody hours.’ And his reply was, ‘You’re going viral.’

On his own website, Graeme explained the aftermath: “The response has been mind-blowing – with offers of interest ranging from small start-up businesses all the way through to large multinational organizations. I’ve received requests to go work abroad and some high-profile individuals have suggested that I start-up on my own which was extremely flattering.”

How to Promote Your Video Resume

It’s not enough to make this kind of video and post it onto Youtube and sit back and let the world find you. Graeme’s advice: “It would be immoral of me to have people believe that they too can secure employment by simply recording a video, sticking it on YouTube and waiting for the offers to role in. If you take anything away from my experience, it’s the importance of being able to PR yourself.”

Your video resume allows you to share your personality with recruiters and hiring managers by adding your video to your personal website, social media sites, email signature, and more. Adding your video resume to your LinkedIn allows recruiters to discover things normally reserved for a first interview. Having a video of yourself greeting visitors to your website inspires prospective employers to trust you – to like you – before they’ve ever even met you.

Upping your game and producing a  more professional looking produced video will help you stand out from the (millions of) poorly produced videos on Youtube.

Ready to star in your own video resume?

If you’re not getting your message into the hands of the people you want to work for, the more likely you are to failing & losing your dream. Learning to make a compelling video resume could be the most effective way to engage the people you’re meant to serve. I have a passion for helping people craft the story of how they’ll create a difference for the companies they want to work with – which is why I’ve created a FREE Videomaking Mastermind group on Facebook.

Join my group to learn how to be comfortable on camera and create professional looking videos on a minimal budget.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/videomakingmastermind/

 

Jump Cuts
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How to use jump cuts to make your videos awesome

When are jump cuts good and when are they bad?

The video above, made with my daughter, fully embraces jump cuts (yes, we’re jumping!) The camera angle is fixed and the goal was to shorten the sequence of us moving up the stairs. I wanted to use this video on Instagram – only 15 seconds – which meant the original footage of the two of us jumping up the entire flight of stairs was far too long.

But, jump cuts can be abrupt. They can be jarring. They can be obnoxious.

Wondering just exactly what a jump cut is?

As the video below demonstrates, shot by the Vimeo Video School, they are not always a good thing.


“A jump cut is a cut in film editing in which two sequential shots of the same subject are taken from camera positions that vary only slightly.” (Thank you Wikipedia!)

You create jump cuts when you cut between two sections of footage shot from the same exact camera angle – for example in a live interview with a talking head. And when they come across as too abrupt and jarring they call attention to your video making process and draw your viewer away from the story you’re telling which is very, (very) bad.

You can easily avoid a (bad) jump cut. The easiest method is to cut between close-ups, medium, and wide shots. Or cut back and forth between your interview subject and B-roll footage – or shoot your subject from two angles and cut back and forth between the two viewpoints.

But what if you love jump cuts?

I may be dating myself, but who can forget that jump cut from the start of 2001 A Space Oddyssey when the ape throws a bone in the air and the scene jumps to a shot of a (bone shaped) space station orbiting the earth? Or the rivetting jump cuts from Run Lola Run? (OK, I’ll admit it, I really liked watching actress Franka Potente run down the streets of Berlin.)

When should you use jump cuts?

Jump cuts are great for showing the passing of time, or to speed up a sequence or to add comedy.

A great example is this ‘Coasting’ video, below, produced for Brahma by videographer Allen Martinez, which uses jump cuts to great effect. (also shot on stairs)

Note the rider’s-eye view sequence (that starts 10 seconds in) once the subject on the scooter descends a long flight of stairs in one of Rio’s favelas.

I hope you enjoyed this post as much as I enjoyed creating it for you.

If you’re online and you’re reading this, then you must be serious about using video for your business, so you’re probably going to want to take a look my FREE guide: the Top 10 Secrets to Attracting Clients with Video

Learn how to attract clients with Awesome Videos even if you have
No Time,
No Money,
and you think you have a face for radio…

The 10 Top Secrets to Attracting Clients with Video guide is FREE >

introduce yourself

How to introduce yourself on video so that it matters

When you introduce yourself & your work do you make people feel like they’re back in high school?

Did you find high school painful? When you were a student would you have been in favor of abolishing your school? (yes, I would’ve)

My own high school years were not pretty. I went to what was supposed to be the finest high school in the country. Phillips Andover Academy. At least that was the myth. In reality the place felt like it was doing its best to drive a bunch of round pegs through square holes. (If you’ve seen the film, Dead Poets Society, then you have some sense of the atmosphere).

In the worst of my classes, the teaching (read: lecturing) was a one-way street. Unless you were called on, there was no engagement. Spontaneity was frowned on. We were placed in required seats, in rows, and made to be mostly passive consumers of required subjects. While having to sit through seemingly endless lectures I recall thinking, “I could find a better way to teach than this – and do a better job than these guys.” (note: when I was a student at Andover, the school was all male, and the teachers were all guys – I know, right? – ugh).

There was one thing that saved me

Photography. By my third year I found my way into the school’s photo lab and basically started spending as much time as I could making images. It was my escape. I was inspired by the world of photojournalism and intrigued by how a single image could capture an entire story. I’ve been following my passion for image making ever since.

But there was another aspect of photography that made a world of difference. The learning was all about doing. The discovery, exploration and education was almost entirely experiential. My two photography teachers became facilitators and guides. I was constantly being asked to try things out on my own – and learn by doing. I loved it. And I thrived. And, because of my level of engagement, I developed a trusting relationship with my photography teachers who became my first true mentors.

So why does this matter?

Let’s say you have a passion, some enterprise or project, that you’re trying to make happen. You offer a unique solution to a problem that a lot of people want help with and you’re inspired to help them out. You’re super talented at what you do and you know that in order to succeed you need to build a following – a community of people who engage with you and your work.

Sound like you?

All you need to do now is teach people about what you offer. As soon as they learn all about your product, your features & services – they’ll start hiring you or buying your thing – right? Well, not exactly.

This is where the problem is.

Take a look at the landscape of how almost everyone (whether a small business or a single freelancer or a social entrepreneur) lets people know about their work.

They end up making me feel a lot like I’m back in my high school history class. Their teaching (read: marketing) is all one way – and it’s all about them. There’s no relevance (to me). (I’m thinking, “Why should I care about this?” and “Why should I pay attention?”)

“But,” you say, “What about social media? Surely having more ways to connect and so many more connections gives us more chances for engagement, right?”

If anything, social media has only made things worse. Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Pinterest have turned us all into one-way broadcasters – creating a fire hose of endless information – that’s all about us.

Here’s the brutal truth: when it comes to the great work you do – nobody cares. People don’t want to hear from you about you. What they care about is their own stuff – and the problems they’re dealing with. If you want to engage with them – building trust and getting them involved with the thing you’re most passionate about – there’s only one way you can do this.

You need to give them the experience of getting the solution they’re looking for.

It doesn’t matter if your passion is dog grooming or design or dealing with climate change – if you’re going to build a following of people who share your passion and who want to work with you, you need to provide an experience of getting the solution.

[bctt tweet=”Want people to follow your passion? Provide the experience of getting the solution you provide.”]

After all those formative years as a student, I moved to the Pacific Northwest where I became an experiential educator. I developed an outdoor program that eventually became part of the Pacific Crest Outward Bound School. The methodology was all about learning by doing. And it involved building trust and engagement and helping groups of young people work together towards a common goal.

All good lessons for today’s entrepreneurs…

Case Study: Geordie Wood and Fader

introduce yourselfIn the video above, made for FADER and Visual Supply Company, Geordie Wood, photo director for The FADER, shares how Visual Supply Company’s new ipad app, Journal will allow more people to see, view, and contribute to photography as a whole. But Wood doesn’t talk about Journal so much as he talks about his own process as a photographer – and what he sees as the value that Journal provides to photographers (and photography lovers) everywhere.

We’re engaged, not because of the features & benefits of the product but because of Wood’s journey and vision.

Welcome to experiential engagement

This is the first of a series of posts I’ll be writing each week to explore the methods, tools and best practices for what I’m calling experiential engagement. To be completely transparent, this is my passion – and I intend to engage as many of you as possible.

I hope the process will provide you some experience of how to create engagement and build community for that thing that you’re most passionate about.

Sound good?

Then join my FREE Videomaking Mastermind Facebook Group and introduce yourself by telling us about your most passionate project – so that we’ll care. (hint: start with the problem you’re solving)

https://www.facebook.com/groups/videomakingmastermind/