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Inspirational Metaphors
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How to Engage Your Video Audience with Inspirational Metaphors

Here’s a case study showing how a simple video was made great by using inspirational metaphors about how the Grand Canyon was formed. Watch how one of the members in my Video making Mastermind group on Facebook shot this video of herself with the Grand Canyon in the background.

Meet personal trainer, Anne Caulkins. Her business is called Wicked Lean and if you’re at all interested in going out there and getting yourself wicked lean, then you should sign up for Anne’s online personal training program – that will give you the body you want.

I made a few suggestions about Anne’s first video. The first one was, “Hey Anne, turn your phone sideways, so we can see more of the canyon!”

The second thing that I suggested was to engage her viewers more. Here she was talking about the Grand Canyon, standing in front of the Grand Canyon, and it would be easy to say, “How many of you have been to the Grand Canyon? If you’ve ever been here before, say, ‘Yes!'”

And in the comments down below people could have said, “Yes, yes yes” and they could’ve mentioned when they were there or what happened to them when they were there. That’s a really good, easy thing to do as a prompt to get people to respond to you.

Next I noted that she’d brought up the inspirational metaphors of, “Here you have this huge canyon, but it took just little drops of water to create it. And those little drops of water were very powerful.” There again she could engage her viewers with questions like, “What are the little drops of water that you’re doing? What’s the little drop of water you’re doing today that’s going to be carving out your Grand Canyon?” Or even better, “What’s the Grand Canyon that you’re carving out?

Two days later Anne made a second video and I just had to share it to show you how easy it is to make just a couple of little shifts that will make all the difference in your video.

I think the second video looks fantastic. This way of using inspirational metaphors in your video is a very powerful thing in terms of getting them to respond to while they’re watching your video – so that they’ll leave a comment and then you can start having a longer conversation with them by replying.

My drop of water is that I make videos. Every week I’m making a new video like this and that little drop of water is carving out a great big canyon of empowering people to show up, and to be themselves, and to share their gifts.

By sharing my own gifts on a regular basis, I’m helping you, and hopefully inspiring you to get out there in the world and gather your people around you and share your gifts with them.

I’d love it if you would comment and tell me, “What’s the drop of water that you’re doing on a regular basis to share your gifts?” And, even better, “What is your Grand Canyon?”

My big invitation to you is to join my FREE Videomaking Mastermind Group on Facebook

http://facebook.com/groups/videomakingmastermind

Join us, share your videos there, and you’ll see how just little tiny shifts your videos will be getting better and better, and you will start showing up more and more.

My special thanks to Anne Caulkins – Wicked Lean
https://www.facebook.com/WickedLean/

video viewers
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2 Proven Ways to turn Video Viewers into Clients

There’s a problem that I see for people who are making videos – and they’ve been making videos for awhile – but they’re just not getting the response that they hoped for. This is a problem because you’re putting out all this effort, and you want to be giving all this value, but it’s like you’re out in the middle of the wilderness and nobody’s showing up, nobody’s commenting and nobody’s giving you the response you want. And now you’re wondering, “How long do I have to keep on doing this?”

I see this pretty commonly, especially over on Youtube. People have a Youtube channel and maybe they’ve made 30 or 40 videos and none of them have really received much in the way of a response. And people are beginning to wonder, “OK, so I’m making videos, when does this turn into anything? When do I start finding clients for my business?”

Here’s a couple of ways that you can move people along so that they will start showing up as who they are and you’ll be able to identify them and start working with them.

The first step in this process is that you want to start making live video. And the reason that you want to do live video is because you can get people to respond to you in the moment in real time. For example you can ask people to make comments. And when you do you want to be very specific. You want to say the specific word to write in the comments so they know what to do and it’s really easy for them to do.

As soon as someone does that, two things happen which are really great! One of them is that Facebook rewards you. If you make a video and all of a sudden a bunch of people are commenting, even if they’re only commenting with one word, Facebook’s algorithm looks at that and goes, “Oh here’s a really engaged video. Here’s a bunch of people who really like this video. This video must be relevant.”

And they’ll actually start showing your video to more people. The more comments you get, the more people will start seeing your video, which means the more comments you’ll get and it just keeps growing like this – and it’s a perfect way to build your audience and to build your reach.

The second thing that happens is that when people comment, all of a sudden instead of being anonymous video viewers they raise their hand and they show up and you can see on Facebook who they are and their profile picture and their name, and then you can reply and start having a real conversation with them.

So for example, in my case, if I know that you’ve said to me, “I make videos, but I’m not getting the response I want.” Then I can start talking to you about how to address that issue and how we can move forward in helping you get better and better response with your videos. And this is something that you’ve told me that you want to work on. If I start helping you do that, that’s a really attractive thing to be doing. And this is the kind of thing you can be doing with your live video so that you start generating real conversation after the video is over – during the replies with the people who watch. This is so powerful and it’s how you start moving people along from being an anonymous viewer to becoming someone who wants to work with you.

Now doing this kind of thing takes practice. You have to try different ideas and see what works. And the best way to practice is with a group of people who can support you – whether you’re doing it weekly or every other week or every other day. Whatever schedule you choose, you want to be doing it in an environment where you’re getting feedback.

I believe so strongly in this that I’ve created a FREE Videomaking Mastermind Group on Facebook.

We’re building an enthusiastic group of entrepreneurs who are all going through the same process together in stepping out into the world in a way that’s very engaging and very attractive and very interactive using this new medium of live video. Join us!

https://www.facebook.com/groups/videomakingmastermind/

live stream an event
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How To Live Stream An Event The Right Way

How do you engage your online audience when you want to live stream an event? I’ve been streaming several live events around Boston and while I’ve been learning a lot in the process, I see one big problem.

When you organize a live event, like a workshop or presentation, it’s a ton of work to fill the room!!! If you’ve managed to attract 100 people – that’s a great success!!

The problem is that no matter how big your event, only so many people can fit in the room which limits how fast your audience can grow and keep your event sustainable.

But, what if you could take advantage of all the work you’ve done and reach an audience 10 times the size…?

Going live is a very good idea to give your event more visibility – but there are some very specific things you can do that will make it all the more appealing to your online audience. Because your online audience needs a certain kind of engagement that’s going to attract them and draw them in.

One event that I’ve been going to is called the Boston Speaker Series and it’s hosted by my friend, Kit Pang. It’s a fabulous event. It’s very interactive and I’ve started going there and live streaming it.

At his last event what Kit did to attract his online viewers was to start his live stream with his phone aimed at himself on a selfie stick while he was talking to his in-real-life audience – making sure that the online viewers could see both him and the audience. He got them to practice the opening with them cheering and then he went live and had them all cheer again as the start of his live stream. (watch the video above to see how well this worked)

That’s step #1 in how to live stream an event: Do something really lively and interactive with your audience at the very start of your Facebook live so that anyone who sees it, whether they’re seeing live or seeing it on the replay, will be drawn in immediately and be caught up by this attention-getting thing that you’re doing. Plus, if you’ve done the work to get 100 people in the room, you want to share their energy and enthusiasm for your event.

The next thing that we did was that I got up in front of the group and I challenged them into seeing how many more people could we attract to the event. I told them to pull out their phones and go to Facebook – and the page where the live stream was happening (facebook.com/awesomevideomakers). Then I asked them to hit the share button, make a comment and hit the like button.

This helps in a few ways. Every person who shares the stream will have the live event showing up on their feed – which means that it can be seen by their friends! So, you’re using your audience in the room to grow your audience on Facebook. And when you are getting a lot of likes and comments Facebook rewards you by making your live stream appear to more people. Facebook loves live video and especially live video that has a lot of interaction in the form of likes and comments. So, it’s important to continue to do interactive things with your online audience – getting them to comment – all the way through your event. (note: you can do this even if you have hardly anyone watching live because people watching the replay will leave comments.

The day of the event we reached over 2,800 people and the video had over 800 views. You can watch the whole video here:

When you’ve done all the work (and it’s a lot!) to create a live event don’t miss your chance to capitalize on your efforts to reach an even larger audience – who you can start engaging with. There’s a lot to know about how best to live stream an event – which is why I have a FREE Videomaking Mastermind Group on Facebook where you can share videos you’ve made and learn from myself and other members of the group. Please join us there and I’ll see you in the videos you’re making!

>>Videomaking Mastermind<<

Video for your business
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3 Best Ways to Make Awesome Video for Your Business

Wondering how to make video without taking a lot of time? Here’s my 3 step strategy which will guide you in the best ways to make video for your business.

Now, I know what you’re thinking: you’re thinking, “Oh video! That’s too much trouble. That’s gonna take way too much time!”

So let’s be honest.

There are lots of ways that you can make video that are really time consuming.

But today, I’m going to show you a system – three simple steps – so that you can put your video out there and you can be sure that you’re going to get a good response from all the effort that you put into making your video.

Sound good?

Step #1 is that you start by going live on Facebook. Now why do you do that? It’s because of reach. You’re going to be able to reach all your friends and all your followers on Facebook because that is where they already are.

Facebook loves live video.

And it rewards you when you make a live video by giving you this huge reach. So, you make a video and it’s typically going to reach out to about 1,000 people – and out of those 1,000 people, several hundred of them will watch your video. That’s the reward that Facebook gives you – every single time.

The real reason to start with live is because it’s easy. The time that it takes you to go live is all the time it takes to make your video. When you’re done, you’re done. There’s no post production, there’s no editing. You don’t even have to upload it anywhere. It’s already live.

If you’re wondering about how do you make video without taking a lot of time or going to a lot of trouble: go onto Facebook. Use the Facebook app. Go live. Press the button, and you’re done!

OK, so what’s step #2?

After you go live, you take that same video and you add a nice introduction that’s been pre-recorded that says, “Hello, I’m this person and I do this thing and today this is what we’re going to talk about.” And put that at the beginning of your video.

At the end, take another section that’s a pre-recorded video that says, “Thanks so much for watching and make sure that after you watch you do this thing that I want you to do.” And give them a call to action.

You take those two parts and you just bolt them onto your video with an editing tool like iMovie – and upload this longer video onto Youtube.

Now why do you upload onto Youtube? Because when you’re on Youtube, now you’re going to get search. On Facebook you get reach, but you don’t get any search. People aren’t going to search for you on Facebook and find you by searching. But they will search for the problem that you solve in your video or the answer to the question that they have that’s in your video. And they go onto Google or they go onto Youtube and they look for the answer you’re providing, and if you have a video on that subject, they can find you and watch your video. So you get more views this way.

And this keeps going on forever when you have a video on Youtube. The unfortunate thing about Facebook is that it gives you great reach but has a short shelf life. Your video goes up but within 24 hours that’s kind of it. It’s not going to get a lot more views. But as soon as you put it on Youtube, it has a shelf life that lasts for a really long time.

Step #3 is you take that video – the same video – and embed it onto your blog. You reach out to your email list and say, “Hey, I just made this great video for you!” Put a little thumbnail picture of the video in the email and you get them to click through and go to your blog post and watch it.

That will create the same kind of search index for people coming to your blog and coming to your website – where you can engage them further. If they’re new visitors, you can invite them to join your email list.

These three steps:

  1. Start with FB live (big reach!!)(no time!!) – do something actionable – people are looking for results – you want to give them the experience of getting the results they’re looking for…
  2. Post on youtube (search!!)(long shelf life!!)
  3. Post on your blog (web site) add bonus content that people can download (grow your email list) bing!!!

Here’s the thing – this information is awesome – but if you don’t make these changes then you will spend too much time and not get the return you’re looking for — if you want to really make these changes then you’ll want to join my FREE Videomaking Mastermind Facebook Group

https://www.facebook.com/groups/videomakingmastermind/

Go do that !! Right now!! I’ll wait right here…

target audience

3 ways to get your target audience thrilled about your big idea

There are few things more frustrating than pouring your heart into your big idea only to see it struggle to take off.

Whether you’re organizing a project, promoting an event or selling a product or service, there’s nothing worse than spending weeks or months of effort to make something happen – and then nobody shows up, or your phone isn’t ringing, or you’re making videos that nobody’s watching.

When this happens it’s problem of enrollment – you’ve failed to fully enroll your target audience.

In their fantastic book, “The Art of Possibility,” co-authors Benjamin an Rosamund Zander spend an entire chapter talking about what it takes to get someone fully enrolled. “Enrolling is not about forcing, cajoling, tricking, bargaining, pressuring, or guilt tripping someone into doing something your way. Enrollment is the art and practice of generating a spark of possibility for others to share. Have no doubt that others eager to catch the spark”.

Can you imagine a world where others are eager to catch your spark?

The Zanders suggest that you approach enrollment as lighting a spark of possibility in others and then be ready to catch their spark in return. Enrollment will take courage in the face of possible rejection(s). Maintaining your passion and a mindset of possibility is essential.

Ready to fully enroll your target audience? Here we go.

1. Join the conversation

In my earlier post on how to introduce yourself on video so that it matters I was dissing social media by saying it’s turned us all into one-way broadcasters – and you only have to spend 10 seconds looking at anyone’s Twitter feed to see the sad truth in this.

But, there’s also a conversation going on about your thing.

To find the conversation, search hashtags on Twitter and Instagram (like #smallbusiness or #communitygarden or #climatechange) or join a Facebook group or go to a local Meetup – you’ll find out what your people are talking about.

You’ll want to look for what they’re saying about the problem that you want to help them solve.

2. Look for questions, frustrations and desires

These are the things that are most relevant to the people who you are wanting to enroll. Personally, the place where I’ve found the most engaged conversations have been in a few of the Facebook groups that I belong to. (and, of course, my own Facebook group)

What you’ll discover are points of engagement. You’ll see questions that generate long threads of discussion and learn which kind of frustrations or desires resonate most.

It doesn’t matter if you think they’re asking the right questions – these are the questions they’re asking – so that’s where you want to start engaging.

3. Respond with something different

You’re going to discover that people have already tried a lot of things to answer their questions, fix their frustrations, and make their dreams come true. If it’s available they’re checking it out. You need to take the time to study what else is out there too, so you can respond with something unique – something they haven’t tried yet.

How does this work in practice?

Here’s an example based on how I like to engage. Let’s say my preferred method of connection is to go to a networking event or a conference. What I find at almost every business related event is plenty of people (like me) who offer marketing services of one kind or another. In fact it sometimes feels like the room is full of marketers.

And everyone there is introducing themselves with the same question, “What do you do?”

And everyone answers the same way – by talking about themselves.

At an event like try entering the conversation, by saying something different. What if you refused to give an answer by talking about yourself. What if instead you answered by responding to the questions, frustrations and desires that are on the minds of practically everyone in the room?

So, for example, after someone asks me what I do, I might answer with, “I like to help people have more meaningful interactions at networking events (like this one) so they meet the kinds of people they’re looking for, attract the right kind of clientele and so they don’t end up feeling like they’ve totally wasted their time.”

See what I did there?

Now I’m talking about the questions and desires and potential frustrations of practically everyone in the room. All of a sudden I’m positioning myself as someone who might have something different to talk about – and be offering the possibility of a unique value proposition.

Whoever I’m talking to is probably wondering, “What you just mentioned is something that I want to know more about – how do you do that?” So, we can keep talking and I can keep asking questions and learn more about their frustrations and desires.

This is exactly what you want to do.

Don’t enter the conversation by talking about your big idea – start by talking about the thing that is their top of mind frustration or desire. If you’re unsure of what that is, then ask a question.

You can craft content like this in your videos and share it on social media, and when you do people will start thinking you’re reading their minds.

if you’d like more interaction than this once-per-week blog post, join my Facebook Group and leave your comments there >

First Kiss Video

4 Surprising Reasons The First Kiss Video Went Viral

How did the First Kiss Video, a simple, black and white video about strangers kissing, become one of the most viewed business video?

At first blush (pun intended) it would appear that Tatia Pilieva’s First Kiss video of complete strangers kissing – with 156 million YouTube views and counting – was a brilliant viral hit. But what were the essential ingredients that made this video so successful?

1. Showing Emotion

The video (above) invited 20 strangers to meet and kiss for the first time – and captured both the awkward and endearing results. “They shed all these layers in front of our eyes and in front of the cameras and that sweetness and kindness resonated with people.”

2. Making it Real

Each couple was asked to meet on the set – and then they just let the cameras roll. “It felt so real and sincere and it was,” Director Patia Pilieva told the New York Times, saying each couple really did meet for the first time the day they shot.

First Kiss Video3. Turning it into something big

First Kiss succeeds as a clever social experiment in the awkwardness of intimacy – showing a quick study in how easily a kiss creates a visceral bond between two people who barely know each other’s names. For the awesome video maker, Tatia Pilieva, the outcome is amazing: She’s  succeeded in creating something culturally interesting and something that has people interested in discussing its very meaning.

Some of the viewers have told Wren Studio that it “restores their faith in love.” That’s pretty good branding.

4. Telling a great story (and don’t be obvious about trying to sell something)

The fact that it was wasn’t obviously a video advertising campaign may be why the video garnered 1,392,296 Facebook shares, and 68,740 Twitter shares in just 31 days. The First Kiss video was created as a subtle advertisement for clothing company Wren Studio, with all the women in the video wearing Wren clothing. Wren creative director, Melissa Coker wrote in Business Insider that, “Traffic to the Wren website increased 14,000%, and 96% of those visitors are new to the site. Sales in the online store are up over 13,600% compared to the week before the First Kiss Video was released.”

When the video was released on Youtube it reached the front page of Reddit by the first evening. By the next day the video had been viewed almost 2 million times and by the end of the week, it had been viewed over 60 million times. It spawned a bunch of parodies, and was covered in The New York Times, Wall Street Journal, CNN, Bloomberg TV, Adweek, Fast Company, Inc, and many more journals and blogs.

How can you put these lessons into action for your own video storytelling?

You can learn how easy it is to get creative, get more confidence and develop your own low budget video marketing strategy. Join my FREE Videomaking Mastermind Group on Facebook and practice how to be more confident on camera, growing your audience and learn how to turn viewers into clients.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/videomakingmastermind/

video resume

Your Video Resume: How to Star in the Best Job Interview Ever

5 Tips for preparing a polished and professional video resume

Will creating the right video resume make you stand out from the crowd? Getting it right can feel like a tough challenge. Most people get hung up on the thought of making video because they think it’s too hard, too expensive & it will take up too much time. But now, with the help of that smart phone in your pocket, you can produce a professional and attention-getting virtual resume – that just might get you the interview you’re looking for.

If you’re considering going down the video resume route, here’s some advice for you.

1. Make it Relevant

Create a video resume because that’s relevant to the job you want to do. If you’re applying for a role in the online, digital media, social or creative professions, then it’s more likely a decent video resume will have the desired effect, like getting you in the door for an interview.

2. Don’t Read Your Resume

Think of producing your video resume like you would a cover letter. What’s the point of a cover letter? To get someone to read your resume (or call you for an interview). Make your video like the big movie studios and create a teaser, or a cliff-hanger. Give them just enough of your personality to get them interested in learning more (and watching the whole movie).

3. Keep it Short

Best rule of thumb: keep it under 60 seconds. Employers review most paper resumes in less than 10 seconds. So, in your first 10 seconds you’ll want to convince the viewer to watch the rest. Bear that in mind and keep your clips short. The video example above works because it’s broken into five short videos – and while it was ultimately successful in getting a job – some of the segments are a big long.

4. Be Creative

Do something novel or unexpected (like Graham’s costume changes in the opening segment above. This absolutely will help you stand out.

5. Be Yourself

This is the most important aspect of making any video. Interviewers are looking to see if you’re going to be a good ‘fit’ for their company. So be yourself. If someone connects with the person you are, then they’ll call you up. If you’re being yourself and they don’t like what they see, then you probably don’t want to work there.

Case Study – a video resume that went viral with the right crowd

video resumeGraeme Anthony, in the video above, is a graphics designer & public relations executive. His cleverly thought out online content adds an extra wow factor to his already outstanding experience. Anthony had recently moved from Manchester to London and was looking for work at some of the top PR firms and advertising agencies there. To get his foot in the door he created this interactive video resume (featuring a highly creative use of Youtube’s annotated links) as a way to showcase his skills – and get the attention of companies where he wanted to work.

Graeme never intended for his video resume to be widely seen by the general public. He posted the video in ‘unlisted’ mode and then researched and sourced individuals/organizations that he wanted to see his CVIV. But then a couple of PR/Social Media bloggers – Paul Armstrong (Kindred) and Robin Grant (We Are Social) asked if they could post about it.

Not thinking too much of it Graeme gave them his permission and left the house (for a job interview as it happens). Two hours later and he returned to find his Twitter stream and email inbox flooded. Panic instantly set in and straightaway he emailed Robin, ‘What’s happened? Who are all these people? It’s only been two bloody hours.’ And his reply was, ‘You’re going viral.’

On his own website, Graeme explained the aftermath: “The response has been mind-blowing – with offers of interest ranging from small start-up businesses all the way through to large multinational organizations. I’ve received requests to go work abroad and some high-profile individuals have suggested that I start-up on my own which was extremely flattering.”

How to Promote Your Video Resume

It’s not enough to make this kind of video and post it onto Youtube and sit back and let the world find you. Graeme’s advice: “It would be immoral of me to have people believe that they too can secure employment by simply recording a video, sticking it on YouTube and waiting for the offers to role in. If you take anything away from my experience, it’s the importance of being able to PR yourself.”

Your video resume allows you to share your personality with recruiters and hiring managers by adding your video to your personal website, social media sites, email signature, and more. Adding your video resume to your LinkedIn allows recruiters to discover things normally reserved for a first interview. Having a video of yourself greeting visitors to your website inspires prospective employers to trust you – to like you – before they’ve ever even met you.

Upping your game and producing a  more professional looking produced video will help you stand out from the (millions of) poorly produced videos on Youtube.

Ready to star in your own video resume?

If you’re not getting your message into the hands of the people you want to work for, the more likely you are to failing & losing your dream. Learning to make a compelling video resume could be the most effective way to engage the people you’re meant to serve. I have a passion for helping people craft the story of how they’ll create a difference for the companies they want to work with – which is why I’ve created a FREE Videomaking Mastermind group on Facebook.

Join my group to learn how to be comfortable on camera and create professional looking videos on a minimal budget.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/videomakingmastermind/

 

Storytelling Video
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3 Simple Steps to Awesome Video Storytelling

What are the 3 essential steps to good video storytelling? And which one do you think is the #1 thing that most people completely miss?

Hopefully, I’ve just modeled the first basic step to good video storytelling which is…

1. Grab your audience’s attention

You’ve only got 10 seconds to grab people’s attention – so give them a challenge, ask them a question or just share something you’re curious about – and, hopefully, they’ll be curious about too.

Basically, you’re selling them, you’re convincing them, to watch the rest of your video.

2. Give them your story

Step number two is to give them the content you promised at the start. In this case you want to tell your story. And your story wants to be about the challenge that you described and the struggle that it takes to overcome that challenge. Talk about struggle. Talk about pain. Talk about the people in your audience that you’re talking to and their struggle and the kinds of things that they need to do to overcome this challenge. Those kinds of solutions will be very helpful for them and they’ll see that as high value.

3. Galvanize with a call to action – at the end of your video.

This is the one thing that many people completely miss when they’re working with video. When they tell a story on video, they don’t think to give a good strong call to action at the end. So don’t miss this essential step.

I’m going to give you a call to action which is: join my Facebook group where you can learn more strategies of how to tell your story in a way that will attract new people to come into your business and into your world.

Video Notes:

This video is part of an ongoing experiment in smartphone video production. It was shot on my iphone using just the selfie camera. For sound I was using the earbuds mike that came with the phone (held in my left hand close to me but out of the shot). If you have any comments or questions about this video please leave your comments on my Facebook group here:

https://www.facebook.com/groups/videomakingmastermind/