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Take the Plunge
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How getting your feet wet every day will grow your business – the entrepreneurs guide to taking the plunge

 

Sometimes lessons in what it takes to help your business grow come from the most unlikely places – like getting your feet wet.

Take the plunge

I used to work for Outward Bound. Every morning we jumped in the ocean. It was always cold. Really cold. And yet we made everyone take the plunge. There was only one way to get used to it.

Do it every day.

At first it seemed like maybe this really wasn’t such a good idea. But by jumping in every day, it became normal. We didn’t just turn it into a daily practice, we made jumping in the ocean part of our cultural identity. When we each agreed to take the plunge, we became members of a tribe who were people of the water. We jumped in every day because we now believed that this was how we how we thrived.

It sounds crazy. It was crazy. No matter the weather, no matter how cold, we jumped in all the way.

Getting your feet wet as a daily practice

Since then I’ve seen first hand how developing a regular practice of ‘getting your feet wet’ works really well for growing your business.

We tend to develop our new stuff in a closet. Musicians call this ‘woodshedding’ – as in a long period of practicing your instrument out back in the wood shed so no one can see or hear you until you’re good enough.

This is not the way to grow your thriving enterprise. If you spend six months developing your next big project on your own, you may well find that you’ve spent all that time on something that no-one cares about.

You need to take the plunge with your new projects.

Jump in – get your feet wet – every day. I know. You’re not quite ready yet. It could be really cold!!

But, if you share some small part of what you’re working on you’ll get feedback right away.

Show Your Work

You may have noticed that this site is all about making videos. So what can you do with video as a daily practice?

You can show your work.

It’s all about reaching out to those you want to connect with. And you know what? If you start sharing part of your work each day you’ll actually start changing your identity. You’ll move from someone who’s thinking about doing something to someone who’s doing stuff.

The art of a daily share-your-work practice is about experimenting your way to success – to stop planning and start acting.

If you’re thinking about plunging in yourself you may be wondering what exactly does it look like?

Here are some helpful guidelines:

1. Plunging has three goals: showcase your creative process, share your vision, learn something from your audience.
2. It gets your feet wet right now. There’s no waiting around. Take a deep breath and… jump.
3. It’s simple.
4. It gets your blood going & moves you out of your comfort zone.
5. It puts you out there in front of your audience.
6. It’s an opportunity for growth.

Sharing early, messy versions of your work can be scary – you will meet your resistance – and you may find your audience doesn’t want what you’re creating.

But that’s how you learn.

And better to learn quickly, with others engaged with you along the way so you can jump in again. (if you fall off your horse, the best thing is to get right back up in the saddle again)

What plunging is not

1. It’s not deciding something. It’s deciding and then doing it.
2. It’s not staying in the closet. It puts you in front of your audience.
3. It’s not about sharing only with your friends and family. You need to jump out in front of the people you most want to impact and serve.
4. It’s not taking a class. You want to be sharing your gifts with the world. Now!

The benefits to getting your feet wet? You’ll avoid costly mistakes. You’ll learn what really works. You’ll do something now. Think for a moment about what getting your feet wet looks like for you. What action can you take that meets the six stages of plunging above?

Here’s how to get started. Just fill in the blanks…

My Next Plunge is: ____________________ (short phrase)
Timeline/deadline: ____________________
Learning Goal: ____________________

Want to jump in with support from others?

Join my FREE Videomaking Mastermind Facebook Group >

successful entrepreneurs
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Thoreau’s Secrets for Successful Entrepreneurs

I can’t think of anyone who could offer better motivation for successful entrepreneurs than Henry David Thoreau – so I shot this video at the site where he wrote his famous book, ‘On Walden Pond.’

Thoreau built his own cabin (yes, he’s the grandfather of the tiny house movement) and lived on Walden Pond for a year while writing his book. What I want to talk about is the inspiration that I’ve gotten, especially as an entrepreneur, from a guy like Henry.

One thing he wrote that really resonates with me was his warning about how ‘men lead lives of quiet desperation.’ When I read those words I thought, “No! I’m not going to do that!”

successful entrepreneursThoreau really was  his own man. “Live the life you have imagined,” he wrote, “simplicity, simplicity, simplicity” – advocating freedom from distractions of the endlessly diverting display of the world of stuff, stuff and more stuff – great entrepreneurial advice! “It’s not enough to be busy. So are the ants. The question is: what are we busy about…?”

He was a thought leader and the inspiration for civil disobedience movements around the world – inspiring people like Gandhi and Martin Luther King to lead their own movements and succeed. And he did this in the face of a lot of challenge – lot’s of people didn’t agree with him or they thought he was kind of crazy.

If you’re an entrepreneur, like I’m an entrepreneur, we are doing something that is genuinely challenging and where other people are looking at us and saying, “Oh, that’ll never work. That’s never going to fly.” And yet here we are continuing to pursue something that we really believe in on our path to becoming successful entrepreneurs.

When I’m facing serious challenges in the work that I do – and it comes up pretty often where I’m thinking, “Oh, I’m not sure that this will work,” or I have some doubt. One of the stories that I tell myself is the story of Thoreau and what he did to carve his own path and to try things and to go against conventional wisdom.

So, what are the inspirations and what are the stories that you tell yourself when you’re facing your challenges?

I would love to hear those in the comments.

Join my FREE Videomaking Mastermind group on Facebook and post your videos and share your stories and get positive feedback. Tell us who’s your inspiration and motivation for becoming successful entrepreneurs?

https://www.facebook.com/groups/videomakingmastermind/

awesome videos
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The 4 Essential Ingredients that make Awesome Videos

I’ve been following lots of teachers online and all of them come up with these simple learning things where they teach you 3 tips or 4 tricks or 5 essentials, and each of the things they teach you start with the same letter. So they’ll offer the 4 P’s or the 5 L’s…

I decided that I wanted to do that myself so in this video I’ve come up with the 4 I’s: The Essential Ingredients to Awesome Videos. And I want you to put in the comments below whether you think this kind of thing is helpful or hokey. Here are the 4 essential ingredients that you need in every single video that you make.

The very first ingredient is Intent. What’s your intention? What’s your reason for making the video? And most importantly, what do you want the people who are watching the video to do? And this is different than what do you want them to learn or what do you want them to understand. You want to think of this as an experience for them. They really want to get some kind of experiential, emotional value from watching your video. So, when they see the video, then they will do something. That’s your intent. What are they going to do after they watch your video?

Then you want to intrigue them. Basically, intrigue is all about selling them the idea of watching your video. At the beginning of the video above I was trying to intrigue you by saying, “I’ve got 4 ingredients.” And now you’re thinking, “Well I wonder what they could possibly be. I know they all start with the letter I, but I don’t know what they are!” Hopefully that intrigues you enough to watch it all the way through. So at the very beginning you have to do something very intriguing to catch their attention.

The third thing is Insight. You want to share your insight. What’s the thing that you know that they don’t? Usually what you’re doing when you’re making a video is you’re solving a problem. And you’re solving a problem for the people who are watching. If they knew how to solve the problem, they’d already be doing it. So, there is something that you know that’s going to help them. You have an insight and that is the main content of your video.

Last but not least, is share your inspiration. You want to inspire them at the end of your video to take action. Cajole them. Inform them. Give them ideas. Give them a very specific call to action so that they will then go do the thing that you want them to do.

So there you have it. The four essential ingredients of every single video: Intent, Intrigue, Insight and Inspire to Action.

Want more insights on how to do live video? And how to get clients from doing live video?

Join my FREE Videomaking Mastermind Group on Facebook

https://www.facebook.com/groups/videomakingmastermind/

Ideal Clients
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What a Boston Attitude Taught me About Ideal Clients

Here’s how I learned the number one thing you can do to attract ideal clients

I live in Boston and when I first moved here from the west coast, I didn’t understand a lot about the local culture. One of the first things that I did when I got here was to go down to Cape Cod and check out the beaches. A friend and I drove down to a town called Woods Hole. When we got there we were driving around looking for the local beach and we couldn’t find it.

Then I saw this guy walking along the side of the road and I said, “He looks like he’s local, let’s ask him.” We pulled over and I rolled down the window and I said, “Hey, do you live around here?”

He took one look at me and said, “WHAT’S-IT MATTAH?”

And I thought, “Oh, this is the local greeting…”

It turned out that he warmed up and he did tell us where the beach was, but my point is that his response is exactly the same as what you’re going to get every time you reach out to your prospective clients or to your ideal target audience. They are always going to come back to you and say, “What’s it matter? Why does it matter to me?

If, in your presentation, you’re not telling them why it matters, they’re not going to pay attention. If all you’re talking about is yourself and you’re not talking about them and their problems, they just don’t care.

I’ve been helping entrepreneurs tell their “Why does it matter” story for the last 10 years and I’ve come to believe two things. The first one is that everyone has a story that’s worth listening to. And the second thing is that because you have a story worth listening to, then you have a responsibility to get it out in the world.

And yet what I see, over and over, is that a lot of entrepreneurs have a great gift, they’ve got this great passion, but when it comes time to tell their story, they crash and burn. And this can be even more pronounced when it comes to telling your story on video.

When people consider doing video and they think it’s too much trouble, it’s too daunting, it’s going to take too much time, it’s going to cost too much money.

I’d like to bust those myths wide open.

If you want to know what it REALLY takes to attract your ideal clients with video and grow your profitable coaching business, then join my FREE Videomaking Mastermind Facebook group here: 

https://www.facebook.com/groups/videomakingmastermind/

 

create change
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How to create change and transformation with video

What’s the biggest thing standing in the way of anyone wanting to create change in their life?

Your business solves a BIG problem – you help your clients make positive changes in their life – and that has huge value, right? So, when you start talking with prospective clients, you may be thinking that if you could just show them the great advantages of working with you, they’d be sure to do it. But describing your process or features, and even your benefits, may not do the trick – no matter how good a job you do of describing your work.

You’re fishing with awesome bait. Why won’t they bite?

The reason is… they don’t think it’s possible.

And this isn’t because they don’t believe you. It’s because they don’t believe in themselves. They don’t think they can do it. They’ve already tried a bunch of things to solve their problem – and it hasn’t worked. So they’ve giving up. They’ve settled for living with whatever version of chronic pain they’re dealing with…

What can you do to help them when they’ve become non-believers? …when they’ve lost their faith?

The answer is simple: tell them a good story.

Tell them a story about someone who is facing the same sort of challenges. Who tried many of the things they tried. Who maybe even gave up on themselves – but who found a solution (by doing your thing).

Why would a story work?

When you tell a story – and this works particularly well with video – the people watching and listening will relate to the character (the hero) of the story. And when the hero experiences pain or despair or triumph – your audience will have the same experience. 

This is the way our brains are wired. When you watch a film – and the main character is having an emotional experience – you experience the same emotions.

This ability is an evolutionary advantage that has been handed down to us since the time of humans sharing stories around a fire. When someone showed up with a story about how they met a tiger and then escaped without getting eating – we’d all pay very close attention – so we could learn about how not to get eaten by the tiger.

When you are able to give your audience the experience of the transformation you offer – a part of the solution to the problem your business serves – you help them believe that a solution is possible. And when they have the experience of possibility with you – you become very attractive. This is why a good story telling video works so well.

Create Change Case Study – Let Me Dance!

Watch the video (above) and you’ll see a group of silver haired women moving gracefully in an adult ballet class.

One by one, they each describe their experience of the class – and we witness their transformation – from feeling old and ordinary to feeling beautiful and able. Listening to the music, watching their movements, hearing their stories about their own transformation – helps us feel the same things they are feeling – gives us the same experience – and helps us believe that we, too, could move gracefully and be beautiful…

How did this video work its magic?

The video was made for an adult ballet class in a small town in the UK. The teacher wanted to attract more students so she engaged a local videographer. The ballet students were shot while they were dancing and also in one-on-one testimonial interviews.

We never hear from the teacher – only her students – who talk about their experience. There’s no script. The whole thing was shot with one camera and available light.

It proves how one simple video – one good story – can create change in our mindset. The dancing women transform – becoming beautiful and graceful before our eyes – making us believers. I couldn’t help thinking, “I hope I’m moving like that when I’m their age,” or better, “I could be moving like that right now!”

And it worked its magic on a multitude. The video has been seen over 1.7 million times on Facebook.

Two things to take away from this video:

1. Testimonial stories can be more powerful and persuasive than talking about what you do yourself.

2. If you pick a beautiful and inspiring story – people will share it (which is how this video has been seen so many times).

If you’d like to learn more about the kind of stories you could be telling to help your prospective clients believe that their transformation is possible, then join my FREE Videomaking Mastermind group on Facebook

It’s a supportive group to share ideas and inspiration with each other.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/videomakingmastermind/

rinse and repeat

Rinse and repeat – Video making by volume

I’d like to let you off the hook.

If you’re like me, you are a bit of a perfectionist. Any time you’ve thought of bringing your work into the world you’ve wanted to make sure that it’s your best. And you take a lot of time polishing and tweaking before you feel ready to show it to anyone.

It doesn’t have to be this way. In fact, your work will get a whole lot better if you focus less on perfecting and more on creating and sharing as often as possible.

How do you ensure you’re doing your best work? Get out in front of people and get their feedback

Case in point comes from a cool little book called Art and Fear. A pottery teacher split his class in half and asked the first half to focus on making one incredibly wonderful piece of pottery. Then he told the other half to make a lot of pots saying they’d be evaluated on their quantity (rather than quality).

So, who came up with the best work?

Invariably, all the best pots came from the group making as many pots as possible.

You can apply this lesson to whatever endeavor you’re engaged with: if you want to make something really great, you need to start making. Striving for perfection will just get in your way.

I know. You just don’t feel ready. You have a Goldilocks mindset. You want everything to be just right.

Don’t let your inner perfectionist hold you back.

Treat your work as an ongoing experiment and embrace the mess you create. Expect the unexpected. Treat everything you do as a learning process.

Do this often. Rinse and repeat.

Case study: Pulse reader

In 2010, right at the time the first ipad came out, two students, Ankit Gupta and Akshay Kothari, were in a one-month course called “Launchpad” in which the students have to start a real company. In order to get into the class you have to pitch a business idea so our two heros raised the question, “why is the experience of mobile news browsing so bad?” And they pitched the idea of a creating a news reader app for the ipad.

rinse and repeatTheir first assignment was to build a functional prototype in 4 days.

To get the job done quickly, they chose to sit in a cafe (a room full of prospective users for their reader) where they had a quick, rough version of their app open on an ipad. Since the ipad was brand new, this was super attractive to everyone who passed by. People who had never seen one would ask about the ipad and they’d let them play with the basic version of their new app. They got tons of immediate feedback from cafe patrons and, as a result, went through hundreds of small revisions each day.

Their published app, called “Pulse Reader” turned out impressive enough to be shown off by Steve Jobs himself and, later on, was sold to LinkedIn for $90 million!! (this story came from the book, Creative Confidence)

How can you get into the rinse and repeat mindset?

Move from planning to action. Share quick, rough versions of a product or service your working on to get fast feed-back. Put a time constraint on yourself. Imagine you have a boss who’s telling you, “I want to see something by the end of the day.” See how quickly you can turn your ideas into action.

Rinse and repeat is a core principle of my program, Video Power Strategy™. It’s about engaging your audience in a way that they ensure you’re doing your best work.

As an experiential educator I’ve seen first-hand how well learning by doing works. If you want to do your best work (and if you want your business to thrive) then you need to jump in with rapid innovation cycles of creating a piece of work, showing it off and learning from the feedback you get. Learn by doing. Rinse and repeat.

Want instant feedback for the next video project you’re working on?
Join our group on Facebook and share often >

target audience

3 ways to get your target audience thrilled about your big idea

There are few things more frustrating than pouring your heart into your big idea only to see it struggle to take off.

Whether you’re organizing a project, promoting an event or selling a product or service, there’s nothing worse than spending weeks or months of effort to make something happen – and then nobody shows up, or your phone isn’t ringing, or you’re making videos that nobody’s watching.

When this happens it’s problem of enrollment – you’ve failed to fully enroll your target audience.

In their fantastic book, “The Art of Possibility,” co-authors Benjamin an Rosamund Zander spend an entire chapter talking about what it takes to get someone fully enrolled. “Enrolling is not about forcing, cajoling, tricking, bargaining, pressuring, or guilt tripping someone into doing something your way. Enrollment is the art and practice of generating a spark of possibility for others to share. Have no doubt that others eager to catch the spark”.

Can you imagine a world where others are eager to catch your spark?

The Zanders suggest that you approach enrollment as lighting a spark of possibility in others and then be ready to catch their spark in return. Enrollment will take courage in the face of possible rejection(s). Maintaining your passion and a mindset of possibility is essential.

Ready to fully enroll your target audience? Here we go.

1. Join the conversation

In my earlier post on how to introduce yourself on video so that it matters I was dissing social media by saying it’s turned us all into one-way broadcasters – and you only have to spend 10 seconds looking at anyone’s Twitter feed to see the sad truth in this.

But, there’s also a conversation going on about your thing.

To find the conversation, search hashtags on Twitter and Instagram (like #smallbusiness or #communitygarden or #climatechange) or join a Facebook group or go to a local Meetup – you’ll find out what your people are talking about.

You’ll want to look for what they’re saying about the problem that you want to help them solve.

2. Look for questions, frustrations and desires

These are the things that are most relevant to the people who you are wanting to enroll. Personally, the place where I’ve found the most engaged conversations have been in a few of the Facebook groups that I belong to. (and, of course, my own Facebook group)

What you’ll discover are points of engagement. You’ll see questions that generate long threads of discussion and learn which kind of frustrations or desires resonate most.

It doesn’t matter if you think they’re asking the right questions – these are the questions they’re asking – so that’s where you want to start engaging.

3. Respond with something different

You’re going to discover that people have already tried a lot of things to answer their questions, fix their frustrations, and make their dreams come true. If it’s available they’re checking it out. You need to take the time to study what else is out there too, so you can respond with something unique – something they haven’t tried yet.

How does this work in practice?

Here’s an example based on how I like to engage. Let’s say my preferred method of connection is to go to a networking event or a conference. What I find at almost every business related event is plenty of people (like me) who offer marketing services of one kind or another. In fact it sometimes feels like the room is full of marketers.

And everyone there is introducing themselves with the same question, “What do you do?”

And everyone answers the same way – by talking about themselves.

At an event like try entering the conversation, by saying something different. What if you refused to give an answer by talking about yourself. What if instead you answered by responding to the questions, frustrations and desires that are on the minds of practically everyone in the room?

So, for example, after someone asks me what I do, I might answer with, “I like to help people have more meaningful interactions at networking events (like this one) so they meet the kinds of people they’re looking for, attract the right kind of clientele and so they don’t end up feeling like they’ve totally wasted their time.”

See what I did there?

Now I’m talking about the questions and desires and potential frustrations of practically everyone in the room. All of a sudden I’m positioning myself as someone who might have something different to talk about – and be offering the possibility of a unique value proposition.

Whoever I’m talking to is probably wondering, “What you just mentioned is something that I want to know more about – how do you do that?” So, we can keep talking and I can keep asking questions and learn more about their frustrations and desires.

This is exactly what you want to do.

Don’t enter the conversation by talking about your big idea – start by talking about the thing that is their top of mind frustration or desire. If you’re unsure of what that is, then ask a question.

You can craft content like this in your videos and share it on social media, and when you do people will start thinking you’re reading their minds.

if you’d like more interaction than this once-per-week blog post, join my Facebook Group and leave your comments there >

video resume

Your Video Resume: How to Star in the Best Job Interview Ever

5 Tips for preparing a polished and professional video resume

Will creating the right video resume make you stand out from the crowd? Getting it right can feel like a tough challenge. Most people get hung up on the thought of making video because they think it’s too hard, too expensive & it will take up too much time. But now, with the help of that smart phone in your pocket, you can produce a professional and attention-getting virtual resume – that just might get you the interview you’re looking for.

If you’re considering going down the video resume route, here’s some advice for you.

1. Make it Relevant

Create a video resume because that’s relevant to the job you want to do. If you’re applying for a role in the online, digital media, social or creative professions, then it’s more likely a decent video resume will have the desired effect, like getting you in the door for an interview.

2. Don’t Read Your Resume

Think of producing your video resume like you would a cover letter. What’s the point of a cover letter? To get someone to read your resume (or call you for an interview). Make your video like the big movie studios and create a teaser, or a cliff-hanger. Give them just enough of your personality to get them interested in learning more (and watching the whole movie).

3. Keep it Short

Best rule of thumb: keep it under 60 seconds. Employers review most paper resumes in less than 10 seconds. So, in your first 10 seconds you’ll want to convince the viewer to watch the rest. Bear that in mind and keep your clips short. The video example above works because it’s broken into five short videos – and while it was ultimately successful in getting a job – some of the segments are a big long.

4. Be Creative

Do something novel or unexpected (like Graham’s costume changes in the opening segment above. This absolutely will help you stand out.

5. Be Yourself

This is the most important aspect of making any video. Interviewers are looking to see if you’re going to be a good ‘fit’ for their company. So be yourself. If someone connects with the person you are, then they’ll call you up. If you’re being yourself and they don’t like what they see, then you probably don’t want to work there.

Case Study – a video resume that went viral with the right crowd

video resumeGraeme Anthony, in the video above, is a graphics designer & public relations executive. His cleverly thought out online content adds an extra wow factor to his already outstanding experience. Anthony had recently moved from Manchester to London and was looking for work at some of the top PR firms and advertising agencies there. To get his foot in the door he created this interactive video resume (featuring a highly creative use of Youtube’s annotated links) as a way to showcase his skills – and get the attention of companies where he wanted to work.

Graeme never intended for his video resume to be widely seen by the general public. He posted the video in ‘unlisted’ mode and then researched and sourced individuals/organizations that he wanted to see his CVIV. But then a couple of PR/Social Media bloggers – Paul Armstrong (Kindred) and Robin Grant (We Are Social) asked if they could post about it.

Not thinking too much of it Graeme gave them his permission and left the house (for a job interview as it happens). Two hours later and he returned to find his Twitter stream and email inbox flooded. Panic instantly set in and straightaway he emailed Robin, ‘What’s happened? Who are all these people? It’s only been two bloody hours.’ And his reply was, ‘You’re going viral.’

On his own website, Graeme explained the aftermath: “The response has been mind-blowing – with offers of interest ranging from small start-up businesses all the way through to large multinational organizations. I’ve received requests to go work abroad and some high-profile individuals have suggested that I start-up on my own which was extremely flattering.”

How to Promote Your Video Resume

It’s not enough to make this kind of video and post it onto Youtube and sit back and let the world find you. Graeme’s advice: “It would be immoral of me to have people believe that they too can secure employment by simply recording a video, sticking it on YouTube and waiting for the offers to role in. If you take anything away from my experience, it’s the importance of being able to PR yourself.”

Your video resume allows you to share your personality with recruiters and hiring managers by adding your video to your personal website, social media sites, email signature, and more. Adding your video resume to your LinkedIn allows recruiters to discover things normally reserved for a first interview. Having a video of yourself greeting visitors to your website inspires prospective employers to trust you – to like you – before they’ve ever even met you.

Upping your game and producing a  more professional looking produced video will help you stand out from the (millions of) poorly produced videos on Youtube.

Ready to star in your own video resume?

If you’re not getting your message into the hands of the people you want to work for, the more likely you are to failing & losing your dream. Learning to make a compelling video resume could be the most effective way to engage the people you’re meant to serve. I have a passion for helping people craft the story of how they’ll create a difference for the companies they want to work with – which is why I’ve created a FREE Videomaking Mastermind group on Facebook.

Join my group to learn how to be comfortable on camera and create professional looking videos on a minimal budget.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/videomakingmastermind/

 

sharing your process

Will Sharing Your Process Help You Rule The World?

You’re a creative person.

And you’re working on stuff that you are crazy for. You say you’d do it even if you didn’t get paid. But there’s something that happens with creatives. They tend to stay in their creative closet. It’s a kind of block that’ll keep you from revealing your true talent. But, with just a little, regular exposure, your creativity can come out of the closet.

In the music making world this is called ‘woodshedding.’ As in ‘Out back practicing in the woodshed for hours and hours to get good enough.’

But you can build your audience, and be engaging, while you’re still in the woodshed. You can share your process – a little at a time – no matter what you do and no matter where you are in your learning curve. Each day you can post a small tidbit of what you’re working on. And you’ll learn so much in the process.

It doesn’t have to take a lot of time. Your share can be a tweet, a Facebook post, a photo on Instagram. But most engaging is a short video. Just pull that smart phone out of your pocket and show us something you’re doing today. Take 30 seconds and then share the clip.

Do this often. Make it a habit. People will respond and you’ll build your community. And once it becomes a habit, it will become part of your creative process – driving your work forward.

How you can do this yourself

The video above is about as good as a sharing your process video can get. It shows just how engaging a story about someone’s process can be. It’s an endearing interview with artist Zina Nicole Lahr and a close look at her process – something she calls, ‘creative compulsive disorder.’

Zina needed something that would showcase her work but also tell a little bit about her personality and her interests. She had two days to shoot and edit so she and videographer Stormy Pyeatte shot the interview and smashed something together to meet their deadline.

But at nearly 6 and 1/2 minutes this video is long. And it shows so many projects. You could easily break this down to eight or nine separate short clips. There’s the LED parasol project, the robot project(s), the tarantula project, the crane puppet, the train puppet, stop animation, the soldering iron, the sea monster… each one of these could be stand-alone 30-seconds-in-a-day-in-the-life-of-the-artist videos.

How do you do this? You keep your smart phone handy with a simple tripod and turn it on when you hit an interesting or inspiring moment in your day.

You can also get help. Zina enlisted her friend who was a videographer. You don’t even need to go that far. Any friend who knows you well could sit behind your smart phone and make sure that you’re in the frame and ask you questions, interview style.

All you have to do is answer. No script needed. Best situation would be to partner with someone and help each other out with making short ‘share your process’ videos with each other. Not only will this make it easier, and better quality, but you can hold each other accountable.

Zina’s video ended up with a lot of visibility. It was chosen as a staff pick on Vimeo and has over 1 million views on facebook. Gives you some idea of the potential response to a ‘here’s what I’m up to’ video.

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…and share what you’re up to!