Posts

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How to be the MacGyver of Social Video Marketing

I want you to feel like you’ve just discovered the Swiss army knife for attracting clients online with social video marketing.

How many people out there are MacGyver fans?

As you know, MacGyver’s the guy who could take a roll of duct tape and a paper clip and fix just about anything. What I want to do is show you how using live video can be the duct tape and paper clip fix for attracting all the clients you need.

The problem that I see is this: We’re all spending a lot of time engaging with people through social media, in our blog, sending out email and all of these different platforms take up all this extra time. It’s a big, big job to do and the more you look at Facebook and then you look at Twitter and then you look over at LinkedIn, the more it can feel overwhelming.

social videoI want to show you the cure for this. Here’s the MacGyver thing. You can be all over the place with social media and then somebody like me comes along as says, “Hey, I got an idea for you. Why don’t we make video?” And the first thing that’s popping into your head is, “Oh no! Not another thing. You mean I have to do video too?”

But if you use live video and you’re just using your phone, first of all you don’t need any other fancy gear – you already have a phone – and when you do the video, the only time it takes is the time to talk into your camera. And when you’re done, you’re really done. There’s no editing, there’s no post production, you don’t even have to upload it anywhere, it’s already up. And the cool thing is that because it’s up on a platform like Facebook – Facebook is where everybody is. Now you’re able to reach a very large and targeted group of people.

But this is where the duct tape comes in.

You can take that same piece of content – the same video – and repurpose it onto Youtube, your blog, into an email blast, on LinkedIn and even take the audio and turn it into a podcast. So, if you’re already blogging or if you’re already doing a podcast or if you already have a Youtube channel, you can start with a Facebook Live video and then use the same content on all your other platforms – and be everywhere in no time at all.

If you really want to really master the MacGyver approach to making social video then join my FREE Videomaking Mastermind Facebook Group where you can post your videos, get positive feedback and learn from what others are doing.

Facebook.com/groups/videomakingmastermind

attention grabbing

How to make attention grabbing videos

The key to creating attention grabbing videos

Does your business feel invisible?

Let’s face it. The world is a crowded place. And busy. And loud. Which means your small business can feel pretty hidden. And your work ends up lost in the crowd.

And we spend tons of energy trying to figure out what new technique or new tool will help us break through all the noise.

But the real answer isn’t ‘out there’ (with the latest snap chat type app). It’s inside you. Your beliefs. Your experience. Your unique approach is what will make you and your business stand out.

You want to engage your customers, but you need to attract their attention first. So how exactly do you create attention grabbing videos?

Here’s the thing: start by challenging an assumption that your customers are making about how they can get the benefit that your product offers.

To be clear, I’ll say this again in a different way: You have a product that offers a solution to a problem (a.k.a. the benefit). Your customers have a belief system about how they’ll get that benefit. Often this is a limited belief. And their belief is not the truth.

It’s a myth. And that myth is ripe to be busted wide open.

This is a job for Mythbusters!
(Cue Ghostbusters theme song…)

Bust open one of their myths (one of their core beliefs) and suddenly they’ll be intrigued – by you. You’ve got their attention. Challenge one of their assumptions and they’ll start tuning in to what you’re saying. Change one of their assumptions and they’ll start following you – (on Facebook & Twitter & Youtube).

So, how can you do this?

Here’s a case study, (see the video above), which is one of the finest recent examples of mythbusting, and attention grabbing videos, out there.

Case Study: Like A Girl

attention grabbing videoThe Like A Girl video (above) works because it breaks one of our collective myths. After watching you’ll probably never use the expression “like a girl” in a negative way — intentionally or not — again.

The video is striking, and attention grabbing, because it directly challenges our collective myth of what it means to do things “like a girl.” We are shown young individuals (both male and female) standing in front of the camera while being interviewed by documentary filmmaker Lauren Greenfield. (F.Y.I. Greenfield is the Sundance Film Festival award-winning creator of “The Queen of Versailles”).

Greenfield asks each one to act out phrases like “Run like a girl” and “Fight like a girl.” As you might expect, they do a lot of exaggerated limp arm movements and feeble running in place.

This works because we know this is real. We’re seeing honest reactions. And we believe it because we’re seeing people respond to the prompts the same way we would respond. It confirms our mythical image of the true meaning of “like a girl.”

Then, the same question is posed to a group of young girls. And one tiny girl’s unequivocal: “It means to run as fast as you can,” when asked: “What does it mean to you when I say: ‘Run like a girl?’” is especially moving.

You can’t help but feel a swell of pride — as if you were their parent, maybe — as you watch her dart across the screen with purpose and power. (full disclosure: I have an 13 year-old daughter so I got swayed).

The video brilliantly sets up two groups of people. Pre-adolescent girls — and the rest of the world. Ask a young girl how to run or throw like a girl and she, surprise, runs or throws. Period. She gives it her all.

Ask a young boy how to run like a girl and you know what you’re going to get. (the male version of our myth).

But what really makes the video is when women are asked to perform these tasks like a girl. Somewhere between girlhood and womanhood, it turns out, they’ve accepted the boys’ idea of throwing and running and hitting like a girl, and mockingly flop their hands and legs. The contrast makes it all too clear how young women lose self-esteem the more they grow up and hear “like a girl” as a derogatory statement.

All of the above succeeds in flying under the radar of the viewers. We’re no longer watching an ad – or a commercially sponsored video, We’ve become intrigued by the social experiment that’s unfolding before our eyes. And the ultimate pattern interrupt with the question, at 1:06, “When did doing something like a girl become an insult?”

Now we’re hooked.

By busting open our myth about what it means to be “like a girl”, the company who created this video, Always, has now captured our attention and prompted a great conversation, for example: “Why can’t ‘run like a girl’ also mean ‘win the race’?”, (and I really appreciate the shift in this video from social experiments about beauty – as in the Dove Real Beauty campaign – to one about empowerment).

Always succeeded because their #Likeagirl video redefined the myth behind the phrase “like a girl.” They captured attention – 58 million views on Youtube. And they started a great ongoing conversation

Do something attention grabbing to challenge your crowd

What myth can you bust open? What assumptions are your customers making that you can challenge?

I’ve created a Free Myth Busting Guide with a set of 5 questions to help you discover how to challenge the myth your customers have about achieving the benefits your business offers. Click here to get the guide >

Your Homework

Read the guide & the 5 myth busting questions and come up with a misconception that your crowd has that you can challenge.

Then join my FREE Videomaking Mastermind Facebook Group and post a video that describes the Myth you’re going to bust for your crowd.

audience engagement
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How to increase audience engagement on live video

Increasing Audience Engagement with Live Video

Let’s say you organized a live event and you managed to get some sponsors and you invited a panel of speakers plus a guest host and then the day of the event turned out to have a torrential rain storm and only 12 people showed up?

Not so great, right?

But what if you live streamed your event? – and encouraged audience engagement? Could you reach a much larger audience and turn your first-time turnout into a big success…?

Here’s an example of a first-time event that had an attendance of fewer than 20 people (including the presenters!) and yet managed to reach an online audience of hundreds viewers who watched the live stream. This case study shows how you can dramatically increase audience engagement.

Just this week, I was at an event that was the first time this event had ever happened. And it was in the morning. It started at 8:00AM and it was on a really rainy day.

You can imagine the turnout we had.

For this event the organizer had recruited three panelists and a host plus another guest speaker and two sponsors who also got up and spoke to the audience – a total of eight people including the organizer himself. The total number of people was less than twenty – so the audience size was pretty modest for this first-time event.

We could have all been quite disappointed at this turnout. However, I was there with my phone and I made the whole thing go live onto Facebook which gave us the chance to reach a much bigger group of people.

I’d like to share with you the results we got from this experiment. There were two things that worked really well for this kind of audience building.

The first thing that happened was that I got up in front of the group and I asked them to pull out their phone and to go to the Awesome Videomakers page on Facebook where they could see the live stream. I enrolled them in the vision of helping us grow the event simply by hitting the share button.

We got a total of 16 shares. Which means practically everyone there actually did what I asked them to. It’s an amazing response from the number of people who were there.

What did that do for us? The live stream had a total reach of over 3,000 people and over 800 views! From an audience of 20 to and audience of 800!

The second thing that we did that seemed to work well was that we asked people who were wathing the video to respond to us during the presentation.

In this case the event was all about leadership for millennials. The organizer of the event asked the audience, “Which generation are you? Are you a millennial? A baby boomer? Generation x? Or generation y? In the comments write in ‘millennial’ or write in ‘baby boomer.'”

And that was a very good prompt. And this is the kind of thing that you want to be doing in your events to get people to respond to you in the comments – even when they’re watching during the replay.

Don’t ask tough questions where they have to write long answers. Give them a multiple choice or give them the word to say to respond. And what that does for you is that it takes an anonymous group of viewers who will now identify themselves. They raise their hand and say, “Here’s my answer.” Facebook displays their name and profile picture so you can reply to them and start having a real conversation.

And then, of course, make sure you invite them to your next event.

Want to learn more about how to increase audience engagement and the nuances of audience building? Then join my FREE Videomaking Mastermind group on Facebook where there’s a daily discussion and lots of video examples being shared.

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1 Simple Live Streaming Hack that will make you right with the world

I’m going to talk about something that’s really been bugging me. I’ve been watching a lot of people go live, and do live streaming, and there’s been this one thing that is just not right about your live streams.

I’m doing it at the start of this video, and I’m wondering if you can take a look at what I’m doing and tell me what’s wrong with this picture?

If you can tell what’s wrong, put it in the comments below…
(Hint: can you read the words on my T shirt?)

Here’s the deal.

A lot of people go live on Facebook and they’re using the selfie-facing camera, which is the one that’s aimed at yourself, and when you do that, that default settings for that camera is to have everything flipped around backwards.

You’re backwards!!

This is especially disorienting when someone is going live while they’re driving because it looks like they’ve moved to the U.K. and now they’re driving from the right side of their car…

And if you have writing on your shirt, or if you want to hold up a sign, or if you have a big logo behind you – all of that is going to be backwards.

Here’s the solution…

Live Streaming HackWhen you’re getting ready to go live with the Facebook app and you open up the app – you can see a little tiny ‘wand’ icon in the top corner of your screen. Press on the wand and you open a narrow menu which has four icons. The top menu icon is a little wrench. Press on that and you’ll open a second menu which has ‘horizontal flip’ as the top choice. Press on ‘horizontal flip’ and your image will right itself!!

The next time you go live make sure you press on the wand and then press on the wrench and then press on ‘horizontal flip’ and you will not be in the land of backwards.

If you’d like to find out what other mistakes you can easily avoid (and if you never want to miss one of my very simple video hacks), then

Join my FREE Videomaking Mastermind Facebook Group >

instagram video

Surprising reasons why Instagram Video Length is Ideal

Why is everyone so afraid of video?

Because they think it takes too much time, it’s too expensive, it’s too difficult or it’s too scary!

Instagram Video Length is ideal to make awesome videos in no time.

Here’s a style of video marketing that’s just way to easy not to do it. Instagram has become a community where you can share visual moments, with your smartphone camera, simply and beautifully. Some moments, however, need more than a static image to come to life – which is why Instagram video was born.

Until fairly recently video has been missing from Instagram. The Instagram video length of up to 2 minutes allows you to make short videos in no time at all and share them across your social platforms on a regular basis. With Instagram video you can make stunning short form videos that build your brand and rock your business.

2 Minute Video Marketing

Yoga instructor Kaitlin Daddona promotes her yoga practice with 15-second videos – made with her iphone – that she uploads to Instagram. She now has a group of 2,000+ people who follow her and every time she posts a new video she gets a couple hundred likes – which means that her followers are making her video visible to others.

Making a video like this is the exact opposite of the perfectionist’s method of spending hours planning your shots and then more hours tweaking the edits. It takes Kaitlin less than five minutes to create a new video start to finish.

And while this works great for a yoga instructor like Kaitlin – imagine the many, short, 15-second videos you could make showing visual parts of your work. Whatever reasons you’ve been hanging onto for why you aren’t yet making your own videos: “it’s too complicated,” “it takes too much time,” “i don’t have the right equipment,” this leaves you with no excuse. Everyone has a smartphone with a video camera – and everyone has ten minutes to put one of these together.

Instagram Video Length of 2 minutes leaves no excuse

Whatever reasons you’ve been hanging onto for why you aren’t yet making your own videos: “it’s too complicated,” “it takes too much time,” “i don’t have the right equipment,” this leaves you with no excuse.

Everyone has a smartphone with a video camera – and everyone has ten minutes to put one of these together.

So, get inspired to make your own Instagram video, and when you do please join my FREE Videomaking Mastermind Group on Facebook where you can share your videos, receive positive feedback and get inspiration from others.

introduce yourself

How to introduce yourself on video so that it matters

When you introduce yourself & your work do you make people feel like they’re back in high school?

Did you find high school painful? When you were a student would you have been in favor of abolishing your school? (yes, I would’ve)

My own high school years were not pretty. I went to what was supposed to be the finest high school in the country. Phillips Andover Academy. At least that was the myth. In reality the place felt like it was doing its best to drive a bunch of round pegs through square holes. (If you’ve seen the film, Dead Poets Society, then you have some sense of the atmosphere).

In the worst of my classes, the teaching (read: lecturing) was a one-way street. Unless you were called on, there was no engagement. Spontaneity was frowned on. We were placed in required seats, in rows, and made to be mostly passive consumers of required subjects. While having to sit through seemingly endless lectures I recall thinking, “I could find a better way to teach than this – and do a better job than these guys.” (note: when I was a student at Andover, the school was all male, and the teachers were all guys – I know, right? – ugh).

There was one thing that saved me

Photography. By my third year I found my way into the school’s photo lab and basically started spending as much time as I could making images. It was my escape. I was inspired by the world of photojournalism and intrigued by how a single image could capture an entire story. I’ve been following my passion for image making ever since.

But there was another aspect of photography that made a world of difference. The learning was all about doing. The discovery, exploration and education was almost entirely experiential. My two photography teachers became facilitators and guides. I was constantly being asked to try things out on my own – and learn by doing. I loved it. And I thrived. And, because of my level of engagement, I developed a trusting relationship with my photography teachers who became my first true mentors.

So why does this matter?

Let’s say you have a passion, some enterprise or project, that you’re trying to make happen. You offer a unique solution to a problem that a lot of people want help with and you’re inspired to help them out. You’re super talented at what you do and you know that in order to succeed you need to build a following – a community of people who engage with you and your work.

Sound like you?

All you need to do now is teach people about what you offer. As soon as they learn all about your product, your features & services – they’ll start hiring you or buying your thing – right? Well, not exactly.

This is where the problem is.

Take a look at the landscape of how almost everyone (whether a small business or a single freelancer or a social entrepreneur) lets people know about their work.

They end up making me feel a lot like I’m back in my high school history class. Their teaching (read: marketing) is all one way – and it’s all about them. There’s no relevance (to me). (I’m thinking, “Why should I care about this?” and “Why should I pay attention?”)

“But,” you say, “What about social media? Surely having more ways to connect and so many more connections gives us more chances for engagement, right?”

If anything, social media has only made things worse. Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Pinterest have turned us all into one-way broadcasters – creating a fire hose of endless information – that’s all about us.

Here’s the brutal truth: when it comes to the great work you do – nobody cares. People don’t want to hear from you about you. What they care about is their own stuff – and the problems they’re dealing with. If you want to engage with them – building trust and getting them involved with the thing you’re most passionate about – there’s only one way you can do this.

You need to give them the experience of getting the solution they’re looking for.

It doesn’t matter if your passion is dog grooming or design or dealing with climate change – if you’re going to build a following of people who share your passion and who want to work with you, you need to provide an experience of getting the solution.

[bctt tweet=”Want people to follow your passion? Provide the experience of getting the solution you provide.”]

After all those formative years as a student, I moved to the Pacific Northwest where I became an experiential educator. I developed an outdoor program that eventually became part of the Pacific Crest Outward Bound School. The methodology was all about learning by doing. And it involved building trust and engagement and helping groups of young people work together towards a common goal.

All good lessons for today’s entrepreneurs…

Case Study: Geordie Wood and Fader

introduce yourselfIn the video above, made for FADER and Visual Supply Company, Geordie Wood, photo director for The FADER, shares how Visual Supply Company’s new ipad app, Journal will allow more people to see, view, and contribute to photography as a whole. But Wood doesn’t talk about Journal so much as he talks about his own process as a photographer – and what he sees as the value that Journal provides to photographers (and photography lovers) everywhere.

We’re engaged, not because of the features & benefits of the product but because of Wood’s journey and vision.

Welcome to experiential engagement

This is the first of a series of posts I’ll be writing each week to explore the methods, tools and best practices for what I’m calling experiential engagement. To be completely transparent, this is my passion – and I intend to engage as many of you as possible.

I hope the process will provide you some experience of how to create engagement and build community for that thing that you’re most passionate about.

Sound good?

Then join my FREE Videomaking Mastermind Facebook Group and introduce yourself by telling us about your most passionate project – so that we’ll care. (hint: start with the problem you’re solving)

https://www.facebook.com/groups/videomakingmastermind/