Posts

,

What’s the quickest way to make an impression on video?

Who are your influences?

Want to make an impression? Tell us about the most influencing people in your life. For example…

When I was five years old my mother took me into New York City to see Robert Preston in “The Music Man”. Live on stage.

The character of “The Music Man” had the energy and charisma to galvanize a jaded community (in River City, Iowa) around music. His vision was bringing communities to life with music.

From him I learned how sheer enthusiasm can be so contagious.

I was hooked. I wanted to be the Music Man.

It was probably one of the most shaping influences of my life. We had the soundtrack at home and I used to put the record on and march around the living room singing “Seventysix Trombones in the Big Parade…!” at the top of my lungs.

You have your own story like this.

There’s a fabulous scene, in the video above, about influences in the movie “The Commitments” – a film about a young man who wants to form a soul band in Dublin (of all places). And when the he auditions new band members, he asks only one question: Who are your influences?

make an impressionWhat is so revealing about your influences?

The scene is a set of jump cuts. The front door is opened to each new person who gives just one answer – and yet, instantly, we get an impression of who they are – what they’re personality is like, how they look at the world – (in addition to the certainty that they’re totally wrong for a soul band).

You need to reveal yourself in your video, so ask yourself the same question.

But don’t settle for a one-word answer. Share the details about the influencing people in your life. Tell the whole narrative of how your life has been affected by them.

You have a story of something profound that shaped who you are and revealing yourself means sharing that story.

Tell that story and the world will see you apart from the others.

Are you ready to reveal yourself, share your stories and learn how to make your own videos? Join my FREE Videomaking Mastermind group on Facebook

It’s a free support group where you can share your own videos and get inspiration and positive feedback from others.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/videomakingmastermind/

,

Cinderella gave me the best advice on how to show up

Because of my daughter I tend to watch a fair number of movies with female heroes. This year Wonder Woman and Super Girl have played across our home screen. But recently we got the DVD to the 2015 version of Cinderella, and not only did I like it, I picked up one of the greatest lessons in how to show up the world.

In the final scene (watch the video) Cinderella has finally been found by the prince. But from her perspective, the jig is up. After all, her only previous encounter with the Prince was at the ball when she had used magic to transform herself into a princess. Now she has to literally come out of the closet and reveal herself as a servant, an orphan, a nobody.

At the moment of truth she catches her reflection in the mirror and the narrator intones, “It is perhaps the greatest risk any of us will take, to be seen as we truly are.”

and then says, “Have courage and be kind.”

Compare this to how most people are choosing to show themselves – especially online – with polished images and perfect seeming lives.

And when we’re showing ourselves on video, it can be especially challenging because we feel as though the whole world could be judging us, right? But when you show up as the person who you are, that can be one of the most attractive things you can do.

So, the next time you get in front of the camera, remember Cinderella: Have courage and be kind.

If you want to practice growing your courage and kindness, (as well as grow your business) then you should join my Big Reach Video group program where you can learn to use live video to build a tribe of raving fans for your business. I’m starting a new group of 20 participants at the end of the month so don’t wait!

Sign up right here >

 

 

 

 

How to develop creative, impressive, soul stirring presentations ~ interview with Angela Lussier

How to develop creative, impressive, soul stirring presentations – interview with Angela Lussier , founder of the Speaker Sisterhood & author of ‘The Secret Life of Speaking Up.’ You can reach Angela at http://angelalussier.us/

How to make your business fascinating – interview with Will Foussier

How to Make Your Business Fascinating – Interview with Will Foussier from Ace-up, a platform to help professionals find the perfect coach. You can reach Will here: https://www.ace-up.com/

,

Thoreau’s Secrets for Successful Entrepreneurs

I can’t think of anyone who could offer better motivation for successful entrepreneurs than Henry David Thoreau – so I shot this video at the site where he wrote his famous book, ‘On Walden Pond.’

Thoreau built his own cabin (yes, he’s the grandfather of the tiny house movement) and lived on Walden Pond for a year while writing his book. What I want to talk about is the inspiration that I’ve gotten, especially as an entrepreneur, from a guy like Henry.

One thing he wrote that really resonates with me was his warning about how ‘men lead lives of quiet desperation.’ When I read those words I thought, “No! I’m not going to do that!”

successful entrepreneursThoreau really was  his own man. “Live the life you have imagined,” he wrote, “simplicity, simplicity, simplicity” – advocating freedom from distractions of the endlessly diverting display of the world of stuff, stuff and more stuff – great entrepreneurial advice! “It’s not enough to be busy. So are the ants. The question is: what are we busy about…?”

He was a thought leader and the inspiration for civil disobedience movements around the world – inspiring people like Gandhi and Martin Luther King to lead their own movements and succeed. And he did this in the face of a lot of challenge – lot’s of people didn’t agree with him or they thought he was kind of crazy.

If you’re an entrepreneur, like I’m an entrepreneur, we are doing something that is genuinely challenging and where other people are looking at us and saying, “Oh, that’ll never work. That’s never going to fly.” And yet here we are continuing to pursue something that we really believe in on our path to becoming successful entrepreneurs.

When I’m facing serious challenges in the work that I do – and it comes up pretty often where I’m thinking, “Oh, I’m not sure that this will work,” or I have some doubt. One of the stories that I tell myself is the story of Thoreau and what he did to carve his own path and to try things and to go against conventional wisdom.

So, what are the inspirations and what are the stories that you tell yourself when you’re facing your challenges?

I would love to hear those in the comments.

Join my FREE Videomaking Mastermind group on Facebook and post your videos and share your stories and get positive feedback. Tell us who’s your inspiration and motivation for becoming successful entrepreneurs?

https://www.facebook.com/groups/videomakingmastermind/

How to make attention grabbing videos

The key to creating attention grabbing videos

I’ve created a Free Myth Busting Guide with a set of 5 questions to help you discover how to challenge the myth your customers have about achieving the benefits your business offers. Click here to get the guide >

Does your business feel invisible?

Let’s face it. The world is a crowded place. And busy. And loud. Which means your small business can feel pretty hidden. And your work ends up lost in the crowd.

And we spend tons of energy trying to figure out what new technique or new tool will help us break through all the noise.

But the real answer isn’t ‘out there’ (with the latest snap chat type app). It’s inside you. Your beliefs. Your experience. Your unique approach is what will make you and your business stand out.

You want to engage your customers, but you need to attract their attention first. So how exactly do you create attention grabbing videos?

Here’s the thing: start by challenging an assumption that your customers are making about how they can get the benefit that your product offers.

To be clear, I’ll say this again in a different way: You have a product that offers a solution to a problem (a.k.a. the benefit). Your customers have a belief system about how they’ll get that benefit. Often this is a limited belief. And their belief is not the truth.

It’s a myth. And that myth is ripe to be busted wide open.

This is a job for Mythbusters!
(Cue Ghostbusters theme song…)

Bust open one of their myths (one of their core beliefs) and suddenly they’ll be intrigued – by you. You’ve got their attention. Challenge one of their assumptions and they’ll start tuning in to what you’re saying. Change one of their assumptions and they’ll start following you – (on Facebook & Twitter & Youtube).

So, how can you do this?

Here’s a case study, (see the video above), which is one of the finest recent examples of mythbusting, and attention grabbing videos, out there.

Case Study: Like A Girl

attention grabbing videoThe Like A Girl video (above) works because it breaks one of our collective myths. After watching you’ll probably never use the expression “like a girl” in a negative way — intentionally or not — again.

The video is striking, and attention grabbing, because it directly challenges our collective myth of what it means to do things “like a girl.” We are shown young individuals (both male and female) standing in front of the camera while being interviewed by documentary filmmaker Lauren Greenfield. (F.Y.I. Greenfield is the Sundance Film Festival award-winning creator of “The Queen of Versailles”).

Greenfield asks each one to act out phrases like “Run like a girl” and “Fight like a girl.” As you might expect, they do a lot of exaggerated limp arm movements and feeble running in place.

This works because we know this is real. We’re seeing honest reactions. And we believe it because we’re seeing people respond to the prompts the same way we would respond. It confirms our mythical image of the true meaning of “like a girl.”

Then, the same question is posed to a group of young girls. And one tiny girl’s unequivocal: “It means to run as fast as you can,” when asked: “What does it mean to you when I say: ‘Run like a girl?’” is especially moving.

You can’t help but feel a swell of pride — as if you were their parent, maybe — as you watch her dart across the screen with purpose and power. (full disclosure: I have an 13 year-old daughter so I got swayed).

The video brilliantly sets up two groups of people. Pre-adolescent girls — and the rest of the world. Ask a young girl how to run or throw like a girl and she, surprise, runs or throws. Period. She gives it her all.

Ask a young boy how to run like a girl and you know what you’re going to get. (the male version of our myth).

But what really makes the video is when women are asked to perform these tasks like a girl. Somewhere between girlhood and womanhood, it turns out, they’ve accepted the boys’ idea of throwing and running and hitting like a girl, and mockingly flop their hands and legs. The contrast makes it all too clear how young women lose self-esteem the more they grow up and hear “like a girl” as a derogatory statement.

All of the above succeeds in flying under the radar of the viewers. We’re no longer watching an ad – or a commercially sponsored video, We’ve become intrigued by the social experiment that’s unfolding before our eyes. And the ultimate pattern interrupt with the question, at 1:06, “When did doing something like a girl become an insult?”

Now we’re hooked.

By busting open our myth about what it means to be “like a girl”, the company who created this video, Always, has now captured our attention and prompted a great conversation, for example: “Why can’t ‘run like a girl’ also mean ‘win the race’?”, (and I really appreciate the shift in this video from social experiments about beauty – as in the Dove Real Beauty campaign – to one about empowerment).

Always succeeded because their #Likeagirl video redefined the myth behind the phrase “like a girl.” They captured attention – 58 million views on Youtube. And they started a great ongoing conversation

Do something attention grabbing to challenge your crowd

What myth can you bust open? What assumptions are your customers making that you can challenge?

I’ve created a Free Myth Busting Guide with a set of 5 questions to help you discover how to challenge the myth your customers have about achieving the benefits your business offers. Click here to get the guide >

Your Homework

Read the guide & the 5 myth busting questions and come up with a misconception that your crowd has that you can challenge.

Then join my FREE Videomaking Mastermind Facebook Group and post a video that describes the Myth you’re going to bust for your crowd.

,

How to Document Your Journey with Live Video

When it comes to making videos, a lot of people are held back because they think they have to create a lot of new content all the time. You might spend all their time thinking about what to create and how to create it and you end up not producing many videos.

Don’t do this.

Instead, the way to start is to document your journey. Show us your process. Take us behind the scenes of what you do for work and in your daily life.

This is perfect for live video and easy to do. Whenever you find yourself in the middle of something, or stuck on a problem, or in a moment of inspiration – go live and document your journey.

If you want to be respected and known for what you do – then start showing up – by showing what you do! Don’t get stalled by thinking it has to be perfect, or scripted, or a finished product.

Live video is a perfect vehicle because it can’t be perfect. It let’s you off the hook and gives you permission to show up as who you are. People who want to create content make a big mistake: they care about the camera, and the lighting, and how they look…

Yes, you can do simple things just using your smartphone to make your video look professional and beautiful (and I can show you how) but don’t let that keep you from going live – and showing up.

Live video helps you be transparent. I mean, really, you don’t need to know all the answers. So, it can be much more effective to show your process of going through your work – facing your challenges – and growing your business – than coming up with the advice that you think you need to give people.

Think about how to document more than thinking about creating. The key is to talk to people around you and get their stories and reactions. The other key is to start!

I’d love to have you make a short video like the one above – showing part of your morning commute. Show us who you are and post it in my FREE Videomaking Mastermind Facebook Group

http://facebook.com/groups/videomakingmastermind

,

How to be ignored & unpopular: the Joshua Bell Subway Video

Here‘s a story about great talent going unnoticed.

Joshua Bell playing incognito in the metro station was organized by the Washington Post as part of a social experiment about perception, taste, and priorities of people.

The questions they were asking:

In a commonplace environment at an inappropriate hour do we perceive beauty? Click To Tweet

Do we stop to appreciate it? Do we recognize talent in an unexpected context?

Why is great talent not enough?

“A man sat at a metro station in Washington DC and started to play the violin; it was a cold January morning. He played six Bach pieces for about 45 minutes. During that time, since it was rush hour, it was calculated that 1,100 people went through the station, most of them on their way to work.

Three minutes went by, and a middle aged man noticed there was a musician playing. He slowed his pace, and stopped for a few seconds, and then hurried up to meet his schedule.

A minute later, the violinist received his first dollar tip: a woman threw the money in the till and without stopping, and continued to walk.

A few minutes later, someone leaned against the wall to listen to him, but the man looked at his watch and started to walk again. Clearly he was late for work.

The one who paid the most attention was a 3 year old boy. His mother tagged him along, hurried, but the kid stopped to look at the violinist. Finally, the mother pushed hard, and the child continued to walk, turning his head all the time. This action was repeated by several other children. All the parents, without exception, forced them to move on.

In the 45 minutes the musician played, only 6 people stopped and stayed for a while. About 20 gave him money, but continued to walk their normal pace. He collected $32. When he finished playing and silence took over, no one noticed it. No one applauded, nor was there any recognition.

No one knew this, but the violinist was Joshua Bell, one of the most talented musicians in the world. He had just played one of the most intricate pieces ever written, on a violin worth $3.5 million dollars.”

Two days before his playing in the subway, Joshua Bell sold out at a theater here in Boston where the seats averaged $100.

The real story behind the Joshua Bell subway video

 

joshua bell subwayWhat bothers me about this story is not that Joshua Bell went unnoticed – it’s the suggestion that since he was ignored there must be something wrong with us and that if we can’t take a few minutes out of our day to notice great talent then we’re kind of doomed to a boring, mundane, existence.

No. I can’t accept this.

What bothers me is that this story is like the one about the king who disguises himself as a beggar and goes out among the common folk – and then ends up being surprised that no one recognizes or accepts him as king once he reveals himself.

There are situations every day of the year where a great many talented people are practicing their craft – and yet they are getting a response equivalent to people ignoring Joshua Bell in the subway.

The simple truth: your talent is not enough

Many of us believe that if we put in the work and we hone our skills and we become the best at what we do – that our talent will shine through and people will recognize and reward us with their patronage.

Actually, you’re story will likely end up like the Joshua Bell subway video. You’ll be ignored.

I know that Joshua’s performance was meant as an experiment and that he purposefully did nothing to showcase himself – except to play his violin. But let’s imagine what he might have done to attract some attention.

Location, Location, Location

Joshua’s first mistake was that he was playing near the entrance to the subway. Everyone knows that early morning commuters are notoriously in a hurry and that when they enter a subway station they will hurry on down to the train platform almost no matter what. On the other hand, the train platform itself has a captive audience – because no matter how much of a hurry you’re in – you’re not going anywhere until the next train comes.

Joshua could have placed himself on a platform and, in between train arrivals, he could have been playing his heart out to an audience that he knew would be forced to wait and listen.

This is important. No matter what it is that you do – you can find an audience that will love your work. Where do they hang out? Where could you find the equivalent of a captive audience? Go there.

Anticipation

joshua bell subway videoThere was a time when all across the United States there were little signs put up along the highway with clever little rhymes. This was an ad campaign by Burma Shave. The series was always in the same structure: four signs each with one line of a rhyme – always humorous with a punch line.

For example:

Don’t put your elbow
Out too far
It may go home
in another car

(there was always a fifth sign that said ‘Burma Shave’ – the ad part)

I remember traveling across the country in my family’s station wagon (at five years old) looking eagerly for the next signs and reading each one aloud. The anticipation was half the fun. I also remember that people made up their own rhymes – as a kind of parody – always ending with ‘burma shave’ which turned out to be an amazingly creative viral strategy for the company.
(full disclosure – the above example may, in fact, be one of the parody rhymes – it’s the only one I can remember off the top of my head)

Not Another Roadside Attraction

joshua bell subway videoTwo decades ago the poet William Stafford used this exact same technique to showcase his poetry. Stafford, a very talented and celebrated poet from Washington state, was grappling with the challenge of how exactly do you bring poetry to the mainstream? How can you get mom and dad and all the kids reading poetry together?

Well, he published a series of poems as roadside attractions along a lonely stretch of highway in the Methow Valley in Eastern Washington. His poems were each placed on weatherproof signs at a series of road turnouts along the route – usually where there was also an incredible view of the natural scenery of the North Cascade Mountains.

A Valley Like This

Sometimes you look at an empty valley like this
and suddenly the air is filled with snow.
That is the way the whole world happened –
there was nothing, and then…

But maybe sometime you will look out and even
the mountains are gone. the world become nothing
again. What can a person do to help
bring back the world?

We have to watch it and then look at each other.
Together we hold it close and carefully
save it, like a bubble that can disappear
if we don’t watch out.

Please think about this as you go on. Breathe on the world.
Hold out your hands to it. When mornings and evenings
roll along, watch how they open and close, how they
invite you to the long party that your life is.

By going to where his target group would be and speaking directly to them, William Stafford captured his audience.

As a result his poetry has been read, and shared, by a larger and far more diverse population.(note these poems were all posted in the pre-internet era.)

You can accomplish the same level of engagement that Stafford did by speaking simply and directly to your audience and addressing their desires.

Imagine if, back in the subway, Joshua Bell had collaborated with a poet who wrote out four lines of poetry about the beauty of music played on a violin – and these lines were then placed on four signs leading to Joshua’s location on a train platform (where everyone would have to listen while waiting for the next train)?

How many would Joshua have engaged then?

Want to harness your audience’s anticipation – and convert your customers into raving fans? Then join my FREE Videomaking Mastermind Group on Facebook

https://www.facebook.com/groups/videomakingmastermind/

,

What a Boston Attitude Taught me About Ideal Clients

Here’s how I learned the number one thing you can do to attract ideal clients

I live in Boston and when I first moved here from the west coast, I didn’t understand a lot about the local culture. One of the first things that I did when I got here was to go down to Cape Cod and check out the beaches. A friend and I drove down to a town called Woods Hole. When we got there we were driving around looking for the local beach and we couldn’t find it.

Then I saw this guy walking along the side of the road and I said, “He looks like he’s local, let’s ask him.” We pulled over and I rolled down the window and I said, “Hey, do you live around here?”

He took one look at me and said, “WHAT’S-IT MATTAH?”

And I thought, “Oh, this is the local greeting…”

It turned out that he warmed up and he did tell us where the beach was, but my point is that his response is exactly the same as what you’re going to get every time you reach out to your prospective clients or to your ideal target audience. They are always going to come back to you and say, “What’s it matter? Why does it matter to me?

If, in your presentation, you’re not telling them why it matters, they’re not going to pay attention. If all you’re talking about is yourself and you’re not talking about them and their problems, they just don’t care.

I’ve been helping entrepreneurs tell their “Why does it matter” story for the last 10 years and I’ve come to believe two things. The first one is that everyone has a story that’s worth listening to. And the second thing is that because you have a story worth listening to, then you have a responsibility to get it out in the world.

And yet what I see, over and over, is that a lot of entrepreneurs have a great gift, they’ve got this great passion, but when it comes time to tell their story, they crash and burn. And this can be even more pronounced when it comes to telling your story on video.

When people consider doing video and they think it’s too much trouble, it’s too daunting, it’s going to take too much time, it’s going to cost too much money.

I’d like to bust those myths wide open.

If you want to know what it REALLY takes to attract your ideal clients with video and grow your profitable coaching business, then join my FREE Videomaking Mastermind Facebook group here: 

https://www.facebook.com/groups/videomakingmastermind/